SRJC Course Outlines

11/26/2020 11:06:48 AMANTHRO 19 Course Outline as of Fall 2017

New Course (First Version)
CATALOG INFORMATION

Discipline and Nbr:  ANTHRO 19Title:  FORENSIC ANTHROPOLOGY  
Full Title:  Forensic Anthropology
Last Reviewed:9/26/2016

UnitsCourse Hours per Week Nbr of WeeksCourse Hours Total
Maximum3.00Lecture Scheduled3.0017.5 max.Lecture Scheduled52.50
Minimum3.00Lab Scheduled06 min.Lab Scheduled0
 Contact DHR0 Contact DHR0
 Contact Total3.00 Contact Total52.50
 
 Non-contact DHR0 Non-contact DHR Total0

 Total Out of Class Hours:  105.00Total Student Learning Hours: 157.50 

Title 5 Category:  AA Degree Applicable
Grading:  Grade or P/NP
Repeatability:  00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP
Also Listed As: 
Formerly: 

Catalog Description:
Untitled document
Introduction to the field of forensic anthropology.  Emphasis will be placed on the techniques used to assess age, sex, ancestry, trauma, pathology, and cause of death from the human skeleton within a medico-legal context. This course will examine the role of the anthropologist in crime scene investigations.

Prerequisites/Corequisites:


Recommended Preparation:
Eligibility for ENGL 1A or equivalent and Course Completion of ANTHRO 1

Limits on Enrollment:

Schedule of Classes Information
Description: Untitled document
Introduction to the field of forensic anthropology.  Emphasis will be placed on the techniques used to assess age, sex, ancestry, trauma, pathology, and cause of death from the human skeleton within a medico-legal context. This course will examine the role of the anthropologist in crime scene investigations.
(Grade or P/NP)

Prerequisites:
Recommended:Eligibility for ENGL 1A or equivalent and Course Completion of ANTHRO 1
Limits on Enrollment:
Transfer Credit:CSU;UC.
Repeatability:00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP

ARTICULATION, MAJOR, and CERTIFICATION INFORMATION

Associate Degree:Effective:Fall 2017
Inactive: 
 Area:C
Natural Sciences
 
CSU GE:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 B2Life ScienceFall 2017
 
IGETC:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 5BBiological SciencesFall 2017
 
CSU Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 2017Inactive:
 
UC Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 2017Inactive:
 
C-ID:

Certificate/Major Applicable: Major Applicable Course



COURSE CONTENT

Student Learning Outcomes:
Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:
Untitled document
1.  Utilize anthropological methods to estimate an individual's sex, age, ancestry,
    trauma, pathology, and cause of death from their skeletal remains.
2.  Demonstrate familiarity with the role and responsibilities of forensic anthropologists
    in the investigative process.

Objectives: Untitled document
Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:
1.  Identify the major bones of the body.
2.  Estimate sex using the human skeleton.
3.  Assess age-at-death of an individual using skeletal and dental markers.
4.  Estimate ancestry from the human skeleton.
5.  Recognize common skeletal pathologies and trauma.
6.  Differentiate among pre-, peri-, and post-mortem skeletal injuries.
7.  Discuss the relevance of forensic anthropology to crime scene investigations.

Topics and Scope
Untitled document
I.     Human osteology
II.    Human odontology
III.   Sex determination techniques
IV.   Age assessment techniques
V.    Ancestry estimation techniques
VI.   Pathology
VII.  Trauma and injury
VIII. Cause of death
IX.    Minimum and maximum number of individuals
X.     Logistics of crime scene analysis
XI.    Role of forensic anthropologist in medico-legal contexts
XII.   Review of well-known forensic anthropology case studies
XIII.  Ethical considerations in forensic anthropology

Assignments:
Untitled document
1.  Reading assignments (between 15 and 50 pages per week).
2.  Writing assignments (1500-3000 word count) include occasional short-answer and essay responses based on homework reading.
3.  Weekly problem-solving reports and/or skills demonstrations with lab models or specimens in class.
4.  Two to four quizzes or exams, which can include multiple choice, true/false, matching items, short answer, essays, and the identification of three-dimensional specimens.

Methods of Evaluation/Basis of Grade.
Writing: Assessment tools that demonstrate writing skill and/or require students to select, organize and explain ideas in writing.Writing
10 - 15%
Short answer and essay responses to assigned homework readings and questions
Problem solving: Assessment tools, other than exams, that demonstrate competence in computational or non-computational problem solving skills.Problem Solving
10 - 15%
Reports based on forensic anthropology cases
Skill Demonstrations: All skill-based and physical demonstrations used for assessment purposes including skill performance exams.Skill Demonstrations
30 - 40%
Identification, measurement, and assembly of skeletal castes, bone and 3-dimensional models
Exams: All forms of formal testing, other than skill performance exams.Exams
30 - 40%
Multiple choice, true/false, matching items, short answer, and essays
Other: Includes any assessment tools that do not logically fit into the above categories.Other Category
0 - 0%
None


Representative Textbooks and Materials:
Untitled document
Introduction to Forensic Anthropology (4th). Byers, Steven N. Routledge: 2016
 
Forensic Anthropology: Current Methods and Practice (1st). Christensen, Angi M., Nicholas V. Passalaqua, and Eric J. Bartelink. Elsevier Academic Press: 2014
 
The Human Bone Manual. White, Tim D. and Pieter A. Folkens. Elsevier Academic Press: 2005 (Classic)

Print PDF