SRJC Course Outlines

10/22/2020 3:17:50 AMENGL 4B Course Outline as of Fall 2018

Changed Course
CATALOG INFORMATION

Discipline and Nbr:  ENGL 4BTitle:  INTER CREATIVE WRIT  
Full Title:  Intermediate Creative Writing
Last Reviewed:4/24/2017

UnitsCourse Hours per Week Nbr of WeeksCourse Hours Total
Maximum3.00Lecture Scheduled3.0017.5 max.Lecture Scheduled52.50
Minimum3.00Lab Scheduled06 min.Lab Scheduled0
 Contact DHR0 Contact DHR0
 Contact Total3.00 Contact Total52.50
 
 Non-contact DHR0 Non-contact DHR Total0

 Total Out of Class Hours:  105.00Total Student Learning Hours: 157.50 

Title 5 Category:  AA Degree Applicable
Grading:  Grade or P/NP
Repeatability:  00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP
Also Listed As: 
Formerly: 

Catalog Description:
Untitled document
Intermediate study and writing of fiction, poetry, drama, and/or creative non-fiction.

Prerequisites/Corequisites:
Course Completion of ENGL 4A


Recommended Preparation:

Limits on Enrollment:

Schedule of Classes Information
Description: Untitled document
Intermediate study and writing of fiction, poetry, drama, and/or creative non-fiction.
(Grade or P/NP)

Prerequisites:Course Completion of ENGL 4A
Recommended:
Limits on Enrollment:
Transfer Credit:CSU;UC.
Repeatability:00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP

ARTICULATION, MAJOR, and CERTIFICATION INFORMATION

Associate Degree:Effective:Inactive:
 Area:
 
CSU GE:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 
IGETC:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 
CSU Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 1981Inactive:
 
UC Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 1981Inactive:
 
C-ID:

Certificate/Major Applicable: Major Applicable Course



COURSE CONTENT

Student Learning Outcomes:
Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:
Untitled document
1.  Analyze major elements of each of the basic genres, including fiction, poetry, drama, and
    creative non-fiction.
2.  Demonstrate effective revision techniques as applied to stylistic elements of at least two
    genres.
3.  Critique and evaluate peers' writing applying specific criteria for revision.
4.  Generate and edit original work representing several genres.
 

Objectives: Untitled document
Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:
I. READING:
A. Identify and analyze major elements of narrative introduced in ENGL 4A, including
    character, setting, plot/conflict, and figurative language in published and peer-written
    narratives with level appropriate skill.
B. Identify and analyze additional elements of narrative, including point of view, tone, structure,
    and dialogue with increasing precision.
C. Identify and analyze major elements of poetry introduced in ENGL 4A, including sound,
    rhythm, figurative language, and the poetic line in published and peer-written poetry with
    precision.
D. Identify and analyze additional elements of poetry, including rhyme schemes, figures of
    speech, symbols, and line breaks.
E. Develop basic dramatic elements such as plot, character, theme, diction, music, spectacle, and
    convention.
F. Analyze and critique peer writing, providing detailed constructive criticism focusing on
    technical and stylistic elements appropriate to the genre.
II. WRITING:
A. Apply creative writing skills through frequent writings in selected genres.
B. Develop basic narrative elements, including character, setting, plot/conflict, and figurative
    language, introduced in ENGL 4A with increased sophistication.
C. Apply elements of narrative, including point of view, tone, structure, and dialogue.
D. Develop basic poetic elements introduced in ENGL 4A, including sound, rhythm, figurative
    language, and the poetic line in new poetic forms.
E. Apply poetic elements, including rhyme schemes, figures of speech, symbols, and line breaks.
F. Choose increasingly effective revision strategies in both narrative and poetic forms.
G. Develop scenes with basic dramatic elements such as plot, character, theme, diction, music,
    spectacle, and convention.

Topics and Scope
Untitled document
I. Reading:
    A. Examples of published work in the genres of fiction, poetry, and creative non-fiction that
         illustrate technical and stylistic elements, such as character, setting, plot/conflict, sound,
         rhythm, and the poetic line.
    B. Examples of published work in the genres of fiction, poetry, and creative non-fiction that
         introduce technical and stylistic elements such as point of view, tone, structure, dialogue,
         rhyme schemes, figures of speech, symbols, and line breaks.
    C. Examples of published works in drama that introduce the order of the play including the
         gathering of the audience, the transition, the exposition, the conflict, the climax, the
         denouement, and criticism.
    D. Examples of various genres of plays including one-act plays, full-length plays, tragedy,
         comedy, tragicomedy, dark comedy, melodrama, farce, documentary, and musical.
II. Writing:
    A. Creative writing elements and techniques for fiction, poetry, and creative non-fiction such
         as point of view, tone, structure, dialogue, rhyme schemes, figures of speech, symbols,
         and line breaks.
    B. Drafting and revision strategies, including discovery, shaping, and polishing.
    C. Written responses to peers' work in progress.
III. Peer Response and Workshop:
    A. Techniques for critiquing peers' work in a workshop setting.
    B. Strategies for providing detailed feedback in a workshop setting.
    C. Self-evaluating peer response to develop a plan for revising.

Assignments:
Untitled document
I. Reading
    A. Read 30 to 50 pages each week of published works in the different genres and/or in craft
         manuals.
    B. Select and closely analyze works by four or more established writers working within
         selected genres of interest, identifying the writers' use of stylistic and technical elements.
    C. Present a 5- to 7-minute oral critique of a work of short fiction by a student writer, focusing
         on creative elements such as point of view, tone, structure, and dialogue.
    D. Read, interpret, and discuss a work of creative non-fiction by an established writer.
    E. Analyze and discuss the internal structure of a narrative poem of 50 lines or more.
    F. Analyze and discuss the components of a play.
II. Writing
    A. Write a minimum of four hours weekly, focusing on maintaining a regular writing
         schedule.
    B. Collect a portfolio of revised works totaling at least 8,000 to 10,000 words, 250 lines of
         extensively edited poetry, or a proportional equivalence of several genres that
         demonstrate intermediate creative writing skills.
    C. Write at least six poems that incorporate symbolism.
    D. Write a 1,000- to 3,000-word prequel or sequel to a work of fiction by an established
         writer, incorporating at least one major element (such as setting or plot) from the original
         work.
    E. Write a 750- to 1,000-word work of creative non-fiction that experiments with a unique
         point of view; or develop an outline and several scenes for a one-act play or novel with
         special attention to a specific sub-genre.
    F. Write a poem developed from an extended metaphor.
    G. Revise and edit extended writings (totaling at least 3,000 to 5,000 words), applying
         feedback from peer critiques, workshops, conferences, or tutorials, and focusing on
         revision techniques such as changing point of view, choosing active verbs, cutting
         scenes that do not move the plot forward, and changing tense.
    H. Write a detailed critique of 500 to 700 words of a classmate's work in a particular genre,
         focusing on elements such as figurative language, scene and summary, text and subtext,
         rhythm and rhyme, or dialogue, as appropriate for the genre of the work.
    I. Write a response to a literary event.

Methods of Evaluation/Basis of Grade.
Writing: Assessment tools that demonstrate writing skill and/or require students to select, organize and explain ideas in writing.Writing
80 - 90%
Portfolio; critical responses; written critiques; reading analysis papers; poems; prequel/sequel project; creative non-fiction paper or outline for longer work (play or novel)
Problem solving: Assessment tools, other than exams, that demonstrate competence in computational or non-computational problem solving skills.Problem Solving
0 - 0%
None
Skill Demonstrations: All skill-based and physical demonstrations used for assessment purposes including skill performance exams.Skill Demonstrations
5 - 10%
Oral critique; discussion of prepared material
Exams: All forms of formal testing, other than skill performance exams.Exams
0 - 0%
None
Other: Includes any assessment tools that do not logically fit into the above categories.Other Category
5 - 10%
Attendance; participation and discussion in a workshop format


Representative Textbooks and Materials:
Untitled document
PRIMARY TEXTS:
Writing Fiction: A Guide to Narrative Craft. 9th ed. Burroway, Janet and Stuckey-French, Ned and Stuckey-French, Ned. Pearson. 2014
In the Palm of Your Hand: A Poet's Portable Workshop. Kowit, Steve.Tilbury House. 2003 (classic)
SUPPLEMENTAL TEXTS:
 
The College Handbook of Creative Writing. 4th ed. DeMaria, Robert. Wadsworth. 2013
Creative Writing: Four Genres in Brief. 2nd ed. Starkey, David. Bedford/St. Martin's. 2012
Writing the Memoir; From Truth to Art. 2nd ed. Barrington, Judith. Eighth Mountain Press. 2002 (classic)
Literary Nonfiction: The Fourth Genre. Minot, Stephen. Prentice Hall, 2002. (classic)
The Discovery of Poetry: A Field Guide to Reading and Writing Poems. Mayes, Frances. Mariner. 2001 (classic)
Writing in General and the Short in Particular. Hills, Rust. Mariner Books. 2000 (classic)
Teachers and Writers Handbook of Poetic Forms. 2nd ed. Padgett, Ron. Teachers and Writers Collaborative. 2000 (classic)
Steering the Craft. LeGuin, Ursula. Eighth Mountain Press. 1998 (classic)
The Poet's Companion. Addonizio, Kim and Laux, Dorianne. Norton. 1997 (classic)
The Art of the Personal Essay. Lopate, Phillip. Anchor. 1995 (classic)
Bird by Bird: Some Instructions on Writing and Life. Lamott, Anne. Anchor. 1995 (classic)
The Art of Fiction: Notes on Craft for Young Writers. Gardner, John. Vintage. 1991 (classic)
 
Examples of established writers may include but are not limited to the following:
Fiction:
Alexi, Sherman
Allison, Dorothy
Carver, Raymond
Castillo, Anna
Cather, Willa
Conrad, Joseph
Ellison, Ralph
Faulkner, William
Heller, Joseph
Joyce, James
Morrison, Toni
Naylor, Gloria
O'Brien, Tim
Yamamoto, Hisaye
 
 
Poetry:
Alarcon, Francisco X.
Auden, W. H.
Brooks, Gwendolyn
Clifton, Lucille
Dickinson, Emily
Espada, Martín
Forché, Carolyn
Ginsberg, Allen
Grahn, Judy
Hass, Robert
Komunyakaa, Yusef
Oliver, Mary
Neruda, Pablo
Rich, Adrienne
Rushdie, Salman
Thomas, Dylan
Whitman, Walt
Young, Al
 
Creative Non-fiction:
Baldwin, James
Capote, Truman
Didion, Joan
Lam, Andrew
Lopez, Barry
Twain, Mark
 
Drama:
Hellman, Lillian
Ibsen, Henrik
Kushner, Tony
Pinter, Harold
Wilson, August
Instructor prepared materials

Print PDF