SRJC Course Outlines

7/21/2019 5:40:16 AMKINES 1 Course Outline as of Spring 2019

Changed Course
CATALOG INFORMATION

Discipline and Nbr:  KINES 1Title:  INTRO TO KINESIOLOGY  
Full Title:  Introduction to Kinesiology
Last Reviewed:9/25/2017

UnitsCourse Hours per Week Nbr of WeeksCourse Hours Total
Maximum3.00Lecture Scheduled3.0017.5 max.Lecture Scheduled52.50
Minimum3.00Lab Scheduled06 min.Lab Scheduled0
 Contact DHR0 Contact DHR0
 Contact Total3.00 Contact Total52.50
 
 Non-contact DHR0 Non-contact DHR Total0

 Total Out of Class Hours:  105.00Total Student Learning Hours: 157.50 

Title 5 Category:  AA Degree Applicable
Grading:  Grade Only
Repeatability:  00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP
Also Listed As: 
Formerly:  PHYED 1

Catalog Description:
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This course is an introduction to the interdisciplinary approach to the science and study of human movement. This course provides an orientation to various educational pathways, requirements, and career opportunities in Kinesiology in the areas of teaching, coaching, therapeutic exercise, fitness and health, and sport management professions. Basic concepts of the Kinesiology discipline and an overview of the relevance of foundational sub-disciplines will be discussed. Issues, challenges, and current/future trends are also addressed.

Prerequisites/Corequisites:


Recommended Preparation:
Eligibility for ENGL 100 or ESL 100

Limits on Enrollment:

Schedule of Classes Information
Description: Untitled document
This course is an introduction to the interdisciplinary approach to the science and study of human movement. This course provides an orientation to various educational pathways, requirements, and career opportunities in Kinesiology in the areas of teaching, coaching, therapeutic exercise, fitness and health, and sport management professions. Basic concepts of the Kinesiology discipline and an overview of the relevance of foundational sub-disciplines will be discussed. Issues, challenges, and current/future trends are also addressed.
(Grade Only)

Prerequisites:
Recommended:Eligibility for ENGL 100 or ESL 100
Limits on Enrollment:
Transfer Credit:CSU;UC.
Repeatability:00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP

ARTICULATION, MAJOR, and CERTIFICATION INFORMATION

Associate Degree:Effective:Inactive:
 Area:
 
CSU GE:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 
IGETC:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 
CSU Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 1981Inactive:
 
UC Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 1981Inactive:
 
C-ID:
 CID Descriptor: KIN 100 Introduction to Kinesiology SRJC Equivalent Course(s): KINES1

Certificate/Major Applicable: Major Applicable Course



COURSE CONTENT

Student Learning Outcomes:
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1. Describe the foundational disciplines of Kinesiology, current objectives, challenges, and role
    in society.
2. Explain the educational pathway, requirements, and job skills necessary for personal career
    choice in the area of  Kinesiology or related fields.
3. Identify, differentiate, and interpret credible sources of information for research in field of
    Kinesiology.

Objectives: Untitled document
Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:
 
1. Identify the basic concepts of Kinesiology.
2. Identify and describe the importance of the foundational subdisciplines of Kinesiology.
3. Explain the role of physical activity and its impact on disease prevention and health
    promotion.
4. Describe contemporary issues and challenges, current/future trends, role in society, aims and
     objectives of Kinesiology.
5. Identify educational requirements, skills and general preparation for various career
    opportunities in teaching, coaching, therapeutic exercise, fitness and health, sport and other
    related disciplines.  
6. Identify credible sources of information for research in the field of Kinesiology and other
    related disciplines.

Topics and Scope
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I. The Fields of Kinesiology
    A. Contemporary programs
    B. Disciplines and sub-disciplines
    C. Allied fields of health, recreation, and dance
    D. Personal philosophy
II. Discipline Goals and Objectives
    A. Historical development
    B. Contemporary goals
     C. Cognitive, affective, and psychomotor learning domains
    D. Role of technology
III. Role in Society and in Education
    A. Chronic disease in U.S.
     B. Health goals of the nation
    C. Implications for fitness and wellness movement
    D. Physical activity and fitness of children, youth and adults
IV. History of Physical Activity
     A. History of Kinesiology discipline and subdisciplines
    B. Disease prevention and health promotion
    C. School physical education
    D. Growth of sports
    E. Programs for individuals with disabilities
V. Motor Behavior
    A. Motor learning, motor development, and motor skills
    B. Stages of learning
VI. Biomechanics
    A. Applied Kinesiology and biomechanics
    B. Mechanical principles
VII. Exercise Physiology
     A. Areas of study
    B. Physical activity, physical fitness, and health
    C. FITT Formula (Frequency Intensity Time and Type)
    D. Health and fitness components
    E. Nutrition and fitness
    F. Ergogenic aids
VIII. Sociology of Physical Activity
    A. Interscholastic and intercollegiate sports
    B. Girls, women, and minorities in sport
    C. Performance enhancing substances in sport
IX. Sport and Exercise Psychology of Physical Activity
    A. Areas of study
    B. Goal setting, behavior change and exercise adherence
    C. Mental imagery and self-talk to enhance performance
X. Preparation and Careers in Kinesiology
    A. Perequisites, general education, certificates, major and minor courses required
         at four year level.
     B. Advanced degree and credential requirements
    C. Leadership and professional development
    D. Therapuetic exercise careers
    E. Teaching and coaching careers
    F. Fitness and health related careers
    G. Sport managment careers              
XI. Issues, Challenges, and the Future
    A. Leadership and teaching values in the field.
     B. Growing fields, challenges, and advocacy
     C. Future trends
XII. Research in the Field of Kinesiology
    A. Research journals in the field
    B. Internet sources
    C. Non credible sources of information
    D. Professional memberships
    E. Continuing education

Assignments:
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1. Evaluate current articles in the field of Kinesiology and related fields
2. Personal portfolio of pathway and requirements for selected career
3. Written assignment of observation or interview of practicing professionals in different careers
4. Conduct labor market research, salary ranges, and  job search opportunities in selected career
5. Complete class project with term paper 2-3 pages
6. Read textbook assignments 15-35 pages per week
7. Quizzes and/or Exams (3 - 17)

Methods of Evaluation/Basis of Grade.
Writing: Assessment tools that demonstrate writing skill and/or require students to select, organize and explain ideas in writing.Writing
30 - 40%
Written Assignments, Personal Portfolio, Research Papers, Term Paper
Problem solving: Assessment tools, other than exams, that demonstrate competence in computational or non-computational problem solving skills.Problem Solving
0 - 0%
None
Skill Demonstrations: All skill-based and physical demonstrations used for assessment purposes including skill performance exams.Skill Demonstrations
0 - 0%
None
Exams: All forms of formal testing, other than skill performance exams.Exams
40 - 60%
Quizzes and Exams: Multiple choice, True/false, Essay
Other: Includes any assessment tools that do not logically fit into the above categories.Other Category
10 - 20%
Participation and Attendance


Representative Textbooks and Materials:
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Introduction to Kinesiology. 5th ed. Hoffman, Shirl and Knudson, Duane. Human Kinetics. 2017

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