SRJC Course Outlines

11/11/2019 8:26:41 PMMA 165 Course Outline as of Fall 2019

Changed Course
CATALOG INFORMATION

Discipline and Nbr:  MA 165Title:  PHARM AND ADMIN OF MEDS  
Full Title:  Pharmacology and Administration of Medications
Last Reviewed:2/11/2019

UnitsCourse Hours per Week Nbr of WeeksCourse Hours Total
Maximum3.00Lecture Scheduled2.0017.5 max.Lecture Scheduled35.00
Minimum3.00Lab Scheduled3.008 min.Lab Scheduled52.50
 Contact DHR0 Contact DHR0
 Contact Total5.00 Contact Total87.50
 
 Non-contact DHR0 Non-contact DHR Total0

 Total Out of Class Hours:  70.00Total Student Learning Hours: 157.50 

Title 5 Category:  AA Degree Applicable
Grading:  Grade Only
Repeatability:  00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP
Also Listed As: 
Formerly: 

Catalog Description:
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Course covers basic pharmacology, including principles of safe preparation, administration, and documentation of medications and vaccinations by oral, parenteral, and topical/transdermal routes. Students review basic math calculations and conversions for preparation and administration of medication and vaccinations. Medications are identified by their clinical use, mechanism of action, side effects, and adverse reactions. Risk factors for drug and alcohol abuse are presented, along with drug addiction and withdrawal symptoms.

Prerequisites/Corequisites:
Course Completion of ANAT 58; OR ANAT 140 AND HLC 140; AND Course Completion of MA 160, MA 161, MA 162, MA 168; AND Concurrent Enrollment in MA 163, MA 163L, MA 169


Recommended Preparation:
Eligibility for ENGL 1A or equivalent or appropriate placement based on AB705 mandates

Limits on Enrollment:

Schedule of Classes Information
Description: Untitled document
Course covers basic pharmacology, including principles of safe preparation, administration, and documentation of medications and vaccinations by oral, parenteral, and topical/transdermal routes. Students review basic math calculations and conversions for preparation and administration of medication and vaccinations. Medications are identified by their clinical use, mechanism of action, side effects, and adverse reactions. Risk factors for drug and alcohol abuse are presented, along with drug addiction and withdrawal symptoms.
(Grade Only)

Prerequisites:Course Completion of ANAT 58; OR ANAT 140 AND HLC 140; AND Course Completion of MA 160, MA 161, MA 162, MA 168; AND Concurrent Enrollment in MA 163, MA 163L, MA 169
Recommended:Eligibility for ENGL 1A or equivalent or appropriate placement based on AB705 mandates
Limits on Enrollment:
Transfer Credit:
Repeatability:00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP

ARTICULATION, MAJOR, and CERTIFICATION INFORMATION

Associate Degree:Effective:Inactive:
 Area:
 
CSU GE:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 
IGETC:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 
CSU Transfer:Effective:Inactive:
 
UC Transfer:Effective:Inactive:
 
C-ID:

Certificate/Major Applicable: Both Certificate and Major Applicable



COURSE CONTENT

Student Learning Outcomes:
Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:
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1.  Explain and demonstrate the principles of safe medication administration in accordance with
    the Medical Board of California's medical assistant (MA) scope of practice, the Occupational
    Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) regulations, the Health Insurance Portability and
    Accountability Act (HIPAA) guidelines, and the California Certifying Board for Medical
    Assistants (CCBMA) requirements.

Objectives: Untitled document
Students will be able to:
1.   Accurately convert and calculate medication and vaccine dosages: for infants, children, and
      adults utilizing standardized units of measure
2.   Utilize accepted pharmacologic abbreviations
3.   Describe drug classifications
4.   Identify the appropriate clinical uses of medications
5.   Identify medications based on Review of Systems (ROS)
6.   List commonly used over-the-counter (OTC) medications
7.   Describe drug side effects and adverse reactions to prescribed and OTC medications
8.   Identify risk factors and withdrawal symptoms of addictive substances
9.   Apply history of drug legislations as it relates to current standards
10. Demonstrate knowledge and scope of practice of the medical assistant as it relates to drug
      administration
11. Prepare and administer medications utilizing medical aseptic technique
12. Document administration of medications using paper and/or Electronic Medical Records
      (EMR)

Topics and Scope
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I. Mathematics of Dosage
    A. Roman numerals
    B. Fractions
    C. Decimal fractions
    D. Percentage
    E. Proportion
    F. Fahrenheit and Celsius
    G. Systems of measurement
    H. Dosage for children
    I. Dosage of drugs standardized in units
II. Basic Pharmacology
    A. Principles of drug administration
    B. Common abbreviations related to route of administration and frequency of dosage
    C. Drugs, by clinical use, including antibiotics, sulfonamides, antihistamines, antihypertensive
         agents, tranquilizers and antidepressants, hormones, diuretics, urinary antiseptics, antineoplastic
         drugs, immunizing and immunosuppressive agents, geriatric medication
    D. Drugs that affect the respiratory system, blood vessels, the blood, the central nervous
         system, the autonomic nervous system, and the digestive system
    E. Vitamins and minerals
    F. OTC medications
III. Adverse Reactions
     A. Identifying symptoms
    B. Required reporting     
IV. Drug and Alcohol Abuse
    A. Signs and symptoms
    B. Treatments
    C. Diversion
    D. Interactions with food and drugs
V. Administration of Medication
    A. Apply history of drug legislation as it relates to current standards
    B. Factors influencing dosage
    C. Parts of a prescription*
    D. Guidelines for preparation and administration of medication*
    E. Systems of measurement conversions*
    F. Preparation and administration of oral medications*
    G. Reconstitution of powdered drugs for parenteral administration*
    H. Withdrawal of medication from an ampule or vial*
    I. Preparation and administration of intradermal and subcutaneous injections*
    J. Location of intramuscular injection sites*
    K. Preparation and administration of intramuscular injections*
    L. Administration of TB tests*
    M. Preparation and administration of topical/transdermal medications*
     N. Spelling review of medications
VI. Scope of Practice
 
*These items are introduced in lecture, and the related skills are performed in the lab.

Assignments:
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Lecture-Related Assignments:
1. Reading 1-3 chapters per week
2. Homework problems
    a. Math assessment and dosage calculation exercises, 5-25 questions per week
    b. Critical thinking exercises from textbook scenarios, 10-25 exercises per week
    c. Vocabulary assessment from textbook,10-20 words per week
3. Completion of 2-6 unit exams and one final exam
4. Completion of the safe medication dosage calculation exam with a score of 90% or better by
    the third attempt. This assignment is not graded for purposes of this course, but failure to
    pass this assignment with a grade of 90% or less on the third attempt will result in a failed
    grade.
 
Lab-Related Assignments:
1. Practice skill performance related to safe calculation, preparation, administration and
    documentation of medications and vaccinations that include oral, parenteral, and
    topical/transdermal routes
2. Demonstrate competency in formal skill check-offs within 3 attempts related to safe
    calculation, preparation, administration and documentation of medications and
    vaccinations that include oral, parenteral, and topical/transdermal routes

Methods of Evaluation/Basis of Grade.
Writing: Assessment tools that demonstrate writing skill and/or require students to select, organize and explain ideas in writing.Writing
0 - 0%
None
This is a degree applicable course but assessment tools based on writing are not included because skill demonstrations are more appropriate for this course.
Problem solving: Assessment tools, other than exams, that demonstrate competence in computational or non-computational problem solving skills.Problem Solving
10 - 20%
Homework problems, dosage calculations, memorization of standard units of measure through classroom participation, exercises, and case scenarios
Skill Demonstrations: All skill-based and physical demonstrations used for assessment purposes including skill performance exams.Skill Demonstrations
40 - 60%
Skill performance competencies
Exams: All forms of formal testing, other than skill performance exams.Exams
30 - 40%
Unit exams and final exam
Other: Includes any assessment tools that do not logically fit into the above categories.Other Category
0 - 0%
None


Representative Textbooks and Materials:
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Instructor prepared materials
Clinical Procedures for Medical Assistants. 10th ed. Bonewit-West, Kathy. Elsevier. 2017
Essentials of Pharmacology for Health Professions. 8th ed. Colbert, Bruce and Woodrow, Ruth and James, Adam. Cengage Learning. 2019

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