SRJC Course Outlines

9/21/2019 11:05:11 AMHORT 184 Course Outline as of Fall 2019

Changed Course
CATALOG INFORMATION

Discipline and Nbr:  HORT 184Title:  INTRO TO ARBORICULTURE  
Full Title:  Introduction to Arboriculture
Last Reviewed:2/11/2019

UnitsCourse Hours per Week Nbr of WeeksCourse Hours Total
Maximum3.00Lecture Scheduled3.0017.5 max.Lecture Scheduled52.50
Minimum3.00Lab Scheduled08 min.Lab Scheduled0
 Contact DHR0 Contact DHR0
 Contact Total3.00 Contact Total52.50
 
 Non-contact DHR0 Non-contact DHR Total0

 Total Out of Class Hours:  105.00Total Student Learning Hours: 157.50 

Title 5 Category:  AA Degree Applicable
Grading:  Grade or P/NP
Repeatability:  00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP
Also Listed As: 
Formerly: 

Catalog Description:
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Principles of urban forestry, arboriculture careers, and tree care; including tree biology, tree identification, plant health care, soils, nutrition, planting, worker safety, climbing, pruning, tree risk assessment, tree care tools and equipment. This course provides the knowledge necessary to be successful in the tree care profession.  This course also prepares students for the International Society of Arboriculture's (ISA) Arborist Certification examination. Field lectures on the SRJC campus and other locations may be required.

Prerequisites/Corequisites:


Recommended Preparation:
Eligibility for ENGL 100 or ESL 100 or appropriate placement based on AB705 mandates; and Eligibility for CS 5 or proficiency in basic productivity software including word processing, spreadsheet, and presentation software; AND Course Completion of HORT 51

Limits on Enrollment:

Schedule of Classes Information
Description: Untitled document
Principles of urban forestry, arboriculture careers, and tree care; including tree biology, tree identification, plant health care, soils, nutrition, planting, worker safety, climbing, pruning, tree risk assessment, tree care tools and equipment. This course provides the knowledge necessary to be successful in the tree care profession.  This course also prepares students for the International Society of Arboriculture's (ISA) Arborist Certification examination. Field lectures on the SRJC campus and other locations may be required.
(Grade or P/NP)

Prerequisites:
Recommended:Eligibility for ENGL 100 or ESL 100 or appropriate placement based on AB705 mandates; and Eligibility for CS 5 or proficiency in basic productivity software including word processing, spreadsheet, and presentation software; AND Course Completion of HORT 51
Limits on Enrollment:
Transfer Credit:
Repeatability:00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP

ARTICULATION, MAJOR, and CERTIFICATION INFORMATION

Associate Degree:Effective:Inactive:
 Area:
 
CSU GE:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 
IGETC:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 
CSU Transfer:Effective:Inactive:
 
UC Transfer:Effective:Inactive:
 
C-ID:

Certificate/Major Applicable: Both Certificate and Major Applicable



COURSE CONTENT

Student Learning Outcomes:
Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:
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1.  Describe the basic function and composition of a tree's vascular system.
2.  Identify the most common structural, biological, and cultural defects associated with urban
    trees.
3.  Compare and contrast various procedures and techniques used in tree pruning and tree care.
 

Objectives: Untitled document
Students will be able to:
1.   Define the practice of arboriculture.
2.   Explain the structure and function of the buds, leaves, wood, and roots of trees.
3.   Explain the concept of Compartmentalization Of Decay In Trees (CODIT).
4.   Explain how plant characteristics such as growth habit, texture, and color can be used in tree
      identification.
5.   Explain the principles of water uptake, transpiration, and the movement of water in the soil.
6.   Explain the significance of urban soils as they apply to nutrition, irrigation, tree health, and
      tree establishment.
7.   Describe the essential nutrients that trees require, how these nutrients are absorbed and the
      advantages and disadvantages of different methods of fertilizer application.
8.   Summarize how a tree species' growth form and site characteristics inform the selection of
      the "right tree for the right place."
9.   Outline what to look for in selecting healthy, vigorous planting stock.
10. Illustrate proper techniques and procedures to plant and transplant trees, and explain how
      using proper techniques can improve survival chances and accelerate establishment.
11. Determine when a tree might be helped by the installation of cables, guys, bracing rods, or
      props.
12. Identify and describe the procedures, techniques and terminology used in various types of
      pruning.
13. Describe the various physiological disorders and injuries that can affect trees, and explain
      what treatments are appropriate.
14. Explain the philosophy of Plant Health Care (PHC) and describe its relationship with
      Integrated Pest Management (IPM).
15. Describe the methods and technology used to assess tree hazard potential.
16. Outline appropriate methods of managing trees during construction, including tree protection
      and preservation.
17. Discuss urban forestry and the environmental, economic, aesthetic, and social benefits and
      costs of trees.
18. Explain how to conduct a tree inventory and describe what information would typically be
      collected in a tree inventory.
19. Identify appropriate safety standards for tree care operations: describe tools, knots, and
      safety equipment used for climbing and working with trees.

Topics and Scope
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I. Introduction to Arboriculture
     A. Definition
    B. Benefits
    C. Careers in arboriculture
II. Tree Biology
     A. Tree anatomy
     B. Tree physiology - Compartmentalization of Decay in Trees (CODIT)
III. Tree Classification and Identification
    A. Classification systems
    B. Botanical nomenclature
    C. Basic identification principles
IV. Soils
     A. Physical properties of soil
    B. Chemical properties of soil
    C. Biological properties of soil
    D. Soil moisture and plant growth
    E. Urban soils
    F. Soil amendment
V. Tree Nutrition and Fertilization
     A. Fertilizing urban trees and the essential elements
    B. Types of fertilizers and their application
    C. Determining nutritional requirements, fertilization toxicity and leaching
VI. Tree Selection
     A. Matching tree and site
    B. Selecting trees at the nursery
VII. Tree Installation and Establishment
     A. Tree installation, types of planting stock and maintenance
    B. Staking or guying newly planted trees
     C. Special considerations and procedures for transplanting palms
VIII. Tree Support and Lightning Protection
     A. Cabling and bracing systems and the installation of cables, guys, bracing rods, or props
     B. Lightning protection systems for trees
    C. Special considerations and procedures for transplanting palms
IX. Pruning
     A. Pruning objectives, procedures and techniques
    B. How trees respond to pruning, and the effects of severe pruning
    C. Techniques and dangers involved with pruning palms
X. Diagnosis and Plant Disorders
     A. Plant problems caused by biotic and abiotic disorders
    B. Diagnostic principles, the signs and symptoms of tree disorders
    C. Physiological disorders and injuries, insect and disease problems
XI. Plant Health Care      
    A. The philosophy of Plant Health Care (PHC) and Integrated Pest Management (IPM)
    B. The Appropriate Response Process (ARP) and diagnosis and treatment of plant health
         problems
    C. An effective monitoring program and plant health management strategies
XII. Tree Assessment and Risk Management
     A. Tree risk assessment procedures, common defects, conditions, site and environmental
         factors
     B. Risk management decision process
    C. Tree hazard mitigation
XIII. Trees and Construction
     A. Construction dangers and damage
    B. Planning stages of development if trees are to be a part of the landscape
    C. Treatment of trees that have been damaged by construction
XIV. Urban Forestry                        
    A. Benefits and costs of trees
    B. Tree valuation and appraisal
    C. Tree inventories
    D. Regulatory and legal issues
    E. Urban forest management
XV. Tree Worker Safety                         
     A. Safety standards for tree care operations, personal protective equipment and proper work
         zone procedures
    B. Identifying potential hazards
    C. Operating chain saws, chippers and other machines
XVI. Climbing and Working in Trees      
     A. Standards and safety regulations for tree care operations
    B. Equipment identification - ropes, knots, tools and machines
    C. The principles of rigging and the equipment and techniques involved
    D. Rigging equipment, techniques and safety and efficiency in lowering limbs
    E. Assessing an emergency situation and proper emergency response procedures

Assignments:
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1. Research paper on a topic related to hazard tree management or maintenance problems and
    their treatment (3 - 5 pages)
2. Weekly reading and homework (20-30 pages/week)
3. In-class exercises (1 - 6)  requiring demonstration of pruning techniques and/or tree inventory
    techniques and/or  proper execution of several arborist knots
4. Exercises and worksheets (4 - 20) related to tree biology, soils, nutrition, pruning, plant health
    care, plant selection, tree risk assessment, and diagnosing plant problems
5. Quizzes (2 - 10), mid-term, and final exam
6. Field trips may be required (0 - 4)

Methods of Evaluation/Basis of Grade.
Writing: Assessment tools that demonstrate writing skill and/or require students to select, organize and explain ideas in writing.Writing
20 - 30%
Homework, worksheets and research paper
Problem solving: Assessment tools, other than exams, that demonstrate competence in computational or non-computational problem solving skills.Problem Solving
20 - 30%
Exercises and Worksheets related to: tree biology, soils, nutrition, pruning, plant health care, plant selection, tree risk assessment, and diagnosing plant problems
Skill Demonstrations: All skill-based and physical demonstrations used for assessment purposes including skill performance exams.Skill Demonstrations
5 - 10%
In-class exercises requiring demonstration of: proper pruning techniques and/or tree inventory techniques and/or execution of several arborist knots
Exams: All forms of formal testing, other than skill performance exams.Exams
20 - 40%
Quizzes, mid-term, and final exam
Other: Includes any assessment tools that do not logically fit into the above categories.Other Category
0 - 20%
Class participation and attendance, including field trips


Representative Textbooks and Materials:
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Arborists' Certification Study Guide. 3rd ed. Lilly, Sharon. International Society of Arboriculture. 2010 (classic)
Arboriculture: Integrated Management of Landscape Trees, Shrubs, and Vines. 4th ed. Harris, Richard and Clark, James and Matheny, Nelda. Pearson. 2003 (classic)

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