SRJC Course Outlines

9/21/2019 4:20:26 AMCSKLS 312 Course Outline as of Fall 2015

Changed Course
CATALOG INFORMATION

Discipline and Nbr:  CSKLS 312Title:  WRITING SKILLS DEVELOP  
Full Title:  Writing Skills Development
Last Reviewed:11/17/2014

UnitsCourse Hours per Week Nbr of WeeksCourse Hours Total
Maximum3.50Lecture Scheduled3.0017.5 max.Lecture Scheduled52.50
Minimum3.50Lab Scheduled06 min.Lab Scheduled0
 Contact DHR2.00 Contact DHR35.00
 Contact Total5.00 Contact Total87.50
 
 Non-contact DHR0 Non-contact DHR Total0

 Total Out of Class Hours:  105.00Total Student Learning Hours: 192.50 

Title 5 Category:  AA Degree Non-Applicable
Grading:  Grade or P/NP
Repeatability:  00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP
Also Listed As: 
Formerly:  CSKL 306

Catalog Description:
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Development of writing skills and fluency necessary for academic classes and  the workplace. Course covers basic sentence structure, punctuation, grammar, paragraphing, narrative composition, and workplace communication.

Prerequisites/Corequisites:


Recommended Preparation:

Limits on Enrollment:

Schedule of Classes Information
Description: Untitled document
Development of writing skills and fluency necessary for academic classes and  the workplace. Course covers basic sentence structure, punctuation, grammar, paragraphing, narrative composition, and workplace communication.
(Grade or P/NP)

Prerequisites:
Recommended:
Limits on Enrollment:
Transfer Credit:
Repeatability:00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP

ARTICULATION, MAJOR, and CERTIFICATION INFORMATION

Associate Degree:Effective:Inactive:
 Area:
 
CSU GE:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 
IGETC:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 
CSU Transfer:Effective:Inactive:
 
UC Transfer:Effective:Inactive:
 
C-ID:

Certificate/Major Applicable: Not Certificate/Major Applicable



COURSE CONTENT

Student Learning Outcomes:
Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:
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1.  Write a coherent 1-2 page narrative composition using correct basic format,
grammar, capitalization, punctuation, spelling, and paragraphing.
2.  Write a career-related communication with a clear purpose and explanation, using language
appropriate for the audience, correct format, and standard edited English.

Objectives: Untitled document
Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:
1. Write correctly punctuated simple and compound sentences.
2. Identify sentence fragments and run-ons and change them into correct sentences.
3. Identify parts of the sentence, including subjects, verbs, and objects.
4. Apply basic punctuation, spelling, and capitalization rules to academic and workplace writing.
5. Write paragraphs with topic sentences and supporting details.
6. Use narrative structure of introduction, body, conclusion for longer compositions.
7. Identify audience and purpose and use appropriate format for academic and workplace writing.
8. Proofread and use word-processing tools to find and correct writing errors.
9. Identify main ideas, details, and sentence patterns in reading selections to enhance written
fluency.

Topics and Scope
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WRITING MECHANICS
Instruction in writing skills will be integrated with instruction in composition.
1. Basic sentence structure
    a. Basic parts of speech, including nouns, pronouns, verbs, and prepositions
    b. Parts of the sentence: subject, predicate/verb, object
    c. Types of sentences: statement, question, command
    d. Simple sentence versus sentence fragment
2. Basic capitalization
    a. Names, family members, titles (Dr., Professor, etc.)
    b. Geographic locations
    c. Groups and organizations
    d. Addresses
3.  Verbs
    a. Linking verbs and auxiliary verbs
    b. Common errors in verb usage
4. Correcting run-on sentences using coordination and subordination
    a. Run-ons and comma splices
    b. Coordinating conjunctions
    c. Transition words
    d. Subordinating conjunctions
    e. Commas and semicolons
5. Other basic punctuation rules
    a. End punctuation
    b. Commas (including series, introductions, interrupting material)
    c. Apostrophes in contractions and possessives
    d. Direct quotations
6. Basic spelling review
    a. Sound-alikes (homophones)
    b. Basic rules (ie/ei, final e, final y, doubling consonants, etc.)
    c. Common roots, prefixes, and suffixes
    d. Effective use of spell-check
 
COMPOSITION
1. Overview of the writing process
2. Prewriting strategies, including free-writing, clustering, and brainstorming
3. Narrative composition writing
    a. Introductory, body, and concluding paragraphs
    b. Topic sentences and supporting details
    c. Logical order
    d. Use of specific details
4. Basic workplace written communications
    a. Roles of email, personal note, memo,  formal letter
    b. Formal letter format, organization, diction
    c. Importance of identifying audience and purpose
5. Proofreading, editing, and revising techniques
6. Basic word-processing and Modern Language Association (MLA)  format
 
READING
Reading will be integrated with writing instruction.
1. Reading selections from nonfiction, literature, and workplace material as prompts and models for writing
2. Analyzing passages for topic sentences, details, structure, and writing style

Assignments:
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1. Weekly homework assignments, including textbook work and exercises in punctuation, grammar,
spelling, and sentence structure
2. 2-4 narrative compositions (at least 2 drafts each)
3. 1 workplace related communication (letter, memo, email), preferably sent to external audience
4. Participation in peer response groups
5. Regularly assigned reading with written responses (4-6)
6. 6-8 quizzes; optional midterm
7. Final exam with writing component
 
Lab: 2 hours/week of writing skills exercises, reading assignments, and word-processing in computer lab

Methods of Evaluation/Basis of Grade.
Writing: Assessment tools that demonstrate writing skill and/or require students to select, organize and explain ideas in writing.Writing
40 - 55%
Writing skills exercises (print and computer), compositions, reading responses
Problem solving: Assessment tools, other than exams, that demonstrate competence in computational or non-computational problem solving skills.Problem Solving
0 - 0%
None
Skill Demonstrations: All skill-based and physical demonstrations used for assessment purposes including skill performance exams.Skill Demonstrations
0 - 0%
None
Exams: All forms of formal testing, other than skill performance exams.Exams
35 - 55%
Quizzes, midterm, final exam: multiple choice, short answer, proofreading, essay
Other: Includes any assessment tools that do not logically fit into the above categories.Other Category
5 - 10%
Attendance and participation, response groups, computer lab work


Representative Textbooks and Materials:
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Foundations First: Sentences and Paragraphs with Readings. Laurie Kirszner and Stephen Mandell. Bedford/St. Martin's. 2011
Grammar and Writing Review, College Skills 312 Series, McGraw-Hill Custom Textbooks. 2013
Number the Stars. Lois Lowry. Bantam Doubleday Dell Publishing Group. New York. 1989 (classic)
Instructor prepared materials

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