SRJC Course Outlines

7/23/2019 5:04:25 AMHIST 20 Course Outline as of Fall 2015

Changed Course
CATALOG INFORMATION

Discipline and Nbr:  HIST 20Title:  US HISTORY SINCE 1945  
Full Title:  History of the US Since 1945
Last Reviewed:4/13/2015

UnitsCourse Hours per Week Nbr of WeeksCourse Hours Total
Maximum3.00Lecture Scheduled3.0017.5 max.Lecture Scheduled52.50
Minimum3.00Lab Scheduled06 min.Lab Scheduled0
 Contact DHR0 Contact DHR0
 Contact Total3.00 Contact Total52.50
 
 Non-contact DHR0 Non-contact DHR Total0

 Total Out of Class Hours:  105.00Total Student Learning Hours: 157.50 

Title 5 Category:  AA Degree Applicable
Grading:  Grade or P/NP
Repeatability:  00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP
Also Listed As: 
Formerly:  HIST 17.3

Catalog Description:
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This course will explore the political, economic, and social history of America from 1945 to the present including the United States' role in the Cold War and post-Cold War eras. Domestic trends examined will include the expanding consumer society, rise of social movements, and the response of neo-conservatism. Additionally, the course will focus on America's relationship to the larger world including the nation's relationship with the Soviet Union, participation in Middle East conflict and globalization.

Prerequisites/Corequisites:


Recommended Preparation:
Eligibility for ENGL 1A or equivalent

Limits on Enrollment:

Schedule of Classes Information
Description: Untitled document
This course will explore the political, economic, and social history of America from 1945 to the present including the United States' role in the Cold War and post-Cold War eras. Domestic trends examined will include the expanding consumer society, rise of social movements, and the response of neo-conservatism. Additionally, the course will focus on America's relationship to the larger world including the nation's relationship with the Soviet Union, participation in Middle East conflict and globalization.
(Grade or P/NP)

Prerequisites:
Recommended:Eligibility for ENGL 1A or equivalent
Limits on Enrollment:
Transfer Credit:CSU;UC.
Repeatability:00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP

ARTICULATION, MAJOR, and CERTIFICATION INFORMATION

Associate Degree:Effective:Spring 1994
Inactive: 
 Area:D
G
Social and Behavioral Sciences
American Cultures/Ethnic Studies
 
CSU GE:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 DSocial ScienceFall 2012
 D3Ethnic Studies  
 D4Gender Studies  
 D6History  
 DSocial ScienceFall 1992Summer 2012
 D1Anthropology and Archeology  
 D2Economics  
 D3Ethnic Studies  
 D4Gender Studies  
 D6History  
 DSocial ScienceFall 1981Summer 1992
 D1Anthropology and Archeology  
 D2Economics  
 D3Ethnic Studies  
 D4Gender Studies  
 
IGETC:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 4Social and Behavioral ScienceFall 2013
 4CEthnic Studies  
 4DGender Studies  
 4FHistory  
 4Social and Behavioral ScienceFall 1981Fall 2013
 4FHistory  
 
CSU Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 1981Inactive:
 
UC Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 1981Inactive:
 
C-ID:

Certificate/Major Applicable: Major Applicable Course



COURSE CONTENT

Student Learning Outcomes:
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Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:
1. Analyze the political, economic, social, and cultural forces that have shaped the
    development of American society and institutions from 1945 to present.
2. Examine the impact of race, class, and gender on particular groups since World War II.
3. Recognize and articulate the relationship between historical concepts and particular facts.
4. Demonstrate an understanding of the causes and effects of historical events after
    World War II.

Objectives: Untitled document
Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:
1. Examine, discuss, and evaluate the experiences, roles, achievements, and contributions of
    European Americans, African Americans, Latinos, and new immigrants after World War II.
2. Use the social historical approach to analyze the past and identify an awareness of historical
    methods used by historians to interpret the past.
3. Identify examples of how class, race, and gender have shaped and reproduced power relations
     in American society since 1945.
4. Employ appropriate vocabulary to analyze American political history and political parties
    after 1945.
5. Assess major social movements including labor, civil rights, feminism, environmentalism,
    religious fundamentalism, neo conservatism, and their impacts on American society and
    politics in the postwar era.
6. Compare and contrast different historical interpretations that explain major historical events
    and social change over time.

Topics and Scope
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1.  Social History: methods of inquiry
2.  Study of history: methods of inquiry and promoting critical thinking
3.  The Legacy of World War II: Race, Class and Gender on the homefront
    a.  "Double V" and A.P. Randolph's March on Washington Movement
    b.  G.I. Forum and League of United Latin Americans
    c.  Bracero program
    d.  "Rosie the Riveter" goes home
4.  Extending the New Deal reform agenda
    a.  G.I. Bill
    b.  Congress of Industrial Organizations (CIO) and postwar labor-liberalism
    c.  Interstate Highway Bill
5.  Origins of the Cold War
    a.  NATO and the Warsaw Pact
    b.  Global Arms Race
    c.  Korean War
6.  McCarthyism, the anticommunist crusade, and postwar liberalism
    a.  Civil rights
    b.  Organized labor
    c.  The disarmament movement
7.  "Crabgrass Frontier": the suburbs
    a.  Consumer culture
    b.  The new Cult of Domesticity
    c.  Redlining, restrictive covenants, and racial/ethnic exclusion
8.  The Civil Rights Movement
    a.  Wartime and postwar migration and the black vote
    b.  Brown versus Board of Education
    c.  Montgomery Bus Boycott
    d.  From "sit-ins" to "freedom rides" to Mississippi Freedom Summer
9.  Cesar Chavez, the United Farm Workers, and community organizing in the West
10. The "Rights Revolution" and Ethnic America
     a. Civil Rights Acts of 1964 and 1965
     b. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission
     c. Fair Housing Act of 1968
     d. Hart-Cellar Act of 1965 and postwar immigration of Asians and Latinos
11. American Indian Movement
     a. Occupation of Alcatraz 1969
     b. Trail of Broken Treaties
     c. Wounded Knee 1973
12. The Cold War in the 1960s
     a. Kennedy and The Bay of Pigs
     b. Kennedy, Khrushchev, and the Cuban Missile Crisis
     c. Vietnam: From Dien Ben Phu to the Tet Offensive
13. Escalation and the Anti-War Movement
     a. LBJ and the Gulf of Tonkin
     b. Students protesters
     c. The Chicano Moratorium
      d. G.I. resistance,
      e. Martin Luther King
      f.  The National Mobilization to End the War
     g. "Credibility Gap" and the Tet Offensive
14. Lyndon Johnson's Great Society: successes and failures
     a. The liberal reform agenda
     b. The War on Poverty
     c. Structural inequality and urban riots
15. Second Wave Feminism
     a. Betty Friedan and NOW
     b. Women's Liberation
     c. Black and Latino feminism
16. The Environmental Justice Movement
17. The Gay Liberation Movement
18. Richard Nixon and the Cold War
      a. Vietnamization and "peace with honor"
      b. D├ętente and normalization of relations with China and the Soviet Union
19. Nixon and Watergate
       a. Expansion of presidential power and authority
       b. "Plumbers," COINTELPRO, and constitutional crisis
20. Deindustrialization and economic decline
       a. Decline of domestic manufacturing
       b. Oil crisis of the mid-1970s
       c. Rising competition in the global economy
21. Demographic change
      a. White flight to the suburbs
      b. Inner cities
22. Rise of the New Right
     a. Neoconservatism, electoral realignment, and resistance to the liberal agenda
     b. Evangelical Christianity as political movement
      c. "Morning in America:" the election of Ronald Reagan
23. The Reagan Era
     a. Deregulation and "supply side" economics
     b. Decline of organized labor
     c. Assault on the welfare state and its impact
24. Cold War in the 1980s
     a.  Intervention in Central America
     b. Iran-Contra scandal
     c. Collapse of the Soviet Union
25. Conflict in the Middle East
     a. Camp David Accords
     b. 1991 Gulf War
26. The New Immigration
     a. Immigration and Reform Act of 1986
     b. Amnesty and continued demand for undocumented labor
     c. Militarization of the border
     d. Changing face of African, Asian, and Latino America
27. The Clinton Era
     a. 1992 Los Angeles Riot
      b. The Information Revolution
     c. The New Economy:  from General Motors to "Wal-Mart economy"
     d. Welfare reform and the feminization of poverty
     e. 1990s boom and growth across the socio-economic spectrum
28. The Bush Era
     a. Response to 9/11
     b. Patriot Act and the debate over civil liberties
     c. Iraq and Afghanistan Wars
29. The Election of Barack Obama

Assignments:
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1. Weekly reading assignments of roughly 40 to50 pages. These assignments
    will consist of primary and secondary sources.
2. 3,000 to 5,000 words of out-of-class writing. These assignments will be
    critical film reviews, analytical essays, or brief responses to reading questions.
    An analytical component will be part of these assignments.
3. One  essay mid-term and a final.
4. Participation in discussion as directed by instructor.
5. Multiple choice quizzes and/or exams.
6. Written homework as directed by the instructor.

Methods of Evaluation/Basis of Grade.
Writing: Assessment tools that demonstrate writing skill and/or require students to select, organize and explain ideas in writing.Writing
20 - 40%
Critical film reviews, analytical essays, or brief responses to reading questions
Problem solving: Assessment tools, other than exams, that demonstrate competence in computational or non-computational problem solving skills.Problem Solving
0 - 0%
None
Skill Demonstrations: All skill-based and physical demonstrations used for assessment purposes including skill performance exams.Skill Demonstrations
0 - 5%
Organization of oral synopsis of weekly readings
Exams: All forms of formal testing, other than skill performance exams.Exams
40 - 70%
Multiple choice and essay exams
Other: Includes any assessment tools that do not logically fit into the above categories.Other Category
10 - 20%
Class participation; oral and analytical synopsis of weekly readings


Representative Textbooks and Materials:
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A History of Our Time:  Readings on Postwar America, Sixth Edition.   Chafe, William,  Bailey, Beth, and  Sitkoff.  Harvard.  Oxford: 2003 (Classic)
 
Postwar Immigrant America:  A Social History.   Ueda, Reed.  Bedford:  1994 (Classic)
 
The Unfinished Journey: America Since World War II, Seventh Edition.  Chafe, William.  Oxford:  2007 (Classic)
 
Instructor prepared materials

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