SRJC Course Outlines

9/16/2019 9:05:32 AMECON 2 Course Outline as of Fall 2012

Changed Course
CATALOG INFORMATION

Discipline and Nbr:  ECON 2Title:  PRIN OF MICROECONOMICS  
Full Title:  Principles of Microeconomics
Last Reviewed:5/14/2018

UnitsCourse Hours per Week Nbr of WeeksCourse Hours Total
Maximum3.00Lecture Scheduled3.0017.5 max.Lecture Scheduled52.50
Minimum3.00Lab Scheduled06 min.Lab Scheduled0
 Contact DHR0 Contact DHR0
 Contact Total3.00 Contact Total52.50
 
 Non-contact DHR0 Non-contact DHR Total0

 Total Out of Class Hours:  105.00Total Student Learning Hours: 157.50 

Title 5 Category:  AA Degree Applicable
Grading:  Grade or P/NP
Repeatability:  00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP
Also Listed As: 
Formerly:  ECON 1B

Catalog Description:
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Survey of microeconomic concepts, principles and theory. Topics include:  Consumer demand, elasticity, business costs, revenues and profits, competitive market structures, monopoly, antitrust law, and international trade and finance.

Prerequisites/Corequisites:
Course Completion of MATH 154 or Course Completion of MATH 155 or higher


Recommended Preparation:
Course Eligibility for ENGL 1A

Limits on Enrollment:

Schedule of Classes Information
Description: Untitled document
Survey of microeconomic concepts, principles and theory. Topics include:  Consumer demand, elasticity, business costs, revenues and profits, competitive market structures, monopoly, antitrust law, and international trade and finance.
(Grade or P/NP)

Prerequisites:Course Completion of MATH 154 or Course Completion of MATH 155 or higher
Recommended:Course Eligibility for ENGL 1A
Limits on Enrollment:
Transfer Credit:CSU;UC.
Repeatability:00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP

ARTICULATION, MAJOR, and CERTIFICATION INFORMATION

Associate Degree:Effective:Fall 1981
Inactive: 
 Area:D
Social and Behavioral Sciences
 
CSU GE:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 DSocial ScienceFall 1981
 D2Economics  
 
IGETC:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 4Social and Behavioral ScienceFall 1981
 4BEconomics  
 
CSU Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 1981Inactive:
 
UC Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 1981Inactive:
 
C-ID:
 CID Descriptor: ECON 201 Principles of Microeconomics SRJC Equivalent Course(s): ECON2

Certificate/Major Applicable: Major Applicable Course



COURSE CONTENT

Outcomes and Objectives:
Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:
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Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:
1. Define scarcity and measure opportunity cost in personal and professional decision making situations.
2. Construct and apply tabular, graphical and algebraic models of the production possibilities, comparative advantage, supply and demand, production, costs and market structures.
3. Evaluate the uses and limitations of price controls, assess the role of government in domestic and international  market economies, and demonstrate the effects of taxes and subsidies on supply and demand curves.

Topics and Scope
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I.  The theory of demand.
      A. The law of demand, revisited
     B. Marginal utility theory and the utility-maximizing principle
     C. Income and substitution effects
      D. Price elasticity of demand and other elasticity concepts
II.  The theory of the firm
     A. Entrepreneurship
     B. Short-run production functions and the law of diminishing returns
     C. Long and short-run cost functions and rising marginal costs
     D. The principle of profit maximization/loss minimization
III.  Industrial organization: the structure, conduct and performance
    of markets
     A. Pure competition
     B. Monopoly
     C. Monopolistic competition
     D. Oligopoly
IV.  Antitrust law
V.  International economics
      A. The principle of comparative advantage
     B. Protectionism
     C. The balance of payments
      D. International monetary systems and the determination of foreign exchange rates
      E. The U.S. trade deficit
      F. Third world economic issues and problems (optional)
VI.  Methodology
     A. Introduction to discipline-specific research tools
     B. Seminal books
     C. Important periodicals, major indexing sources, professional
         or trade organizations, standard reference tools
     D. Discipline-specific tools and major web sites, for both national and global economics

Assignments:
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1.  Read and study appropriate chapters in text.
2.  Approximately 3 homework problem sets to be prepared for review
   and in-class discussion.
3.  Frequently assigned end-of-chapter questions to be prepared for
   review and in-class discussion.
4.  2-4 in-class, closed-book, no-notes, examinations/quizzes including a final.
5.  Written assignments and chapter questions

Methods of Evaluation/Basis of Grade.
Writing: Assessment tools that demonstrate writing skill and/or require students to select, organize and explain ideas in writing.Writing
5 - 30%
Written homework
Problem solving: Assessment tools, other than exams, that demonstrate competence in computational or non-computational problem solving skills.Problem Solving
10 - 40%
Homework problems involving computation and graphing.
Skill Demonstrations: All skill-based and physical demonstrations used for assessment purposes including skill performance exams.Skill Demonstrations
0 - 0%
None
Exams: All forms of formal testing, other than skill performance exams.Exams
50 - 80%
Quizzes and essay exams
Other: Includes any assessment tools that do not logically fit into the above categories.Other Category
0 - 0%
None


Representative Textbooks and Materials:
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Economics, 19th edition. McConnell & Brue. McGraw-Hill Companies: 2011.

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