SRJC Course Outlines

10/31/2020 12:33:12 PMTHAR 1 Course Outline as of Fall 2005

Changed Course
CATALOG INFORMATION

Discipline and Nbr:  THAR 1Title:  WORLD THEATRE  
Full Title:  World Theatre Through Time
Last Reviewed:5/11/2020

UnitsCourse Hours per Week Nbr of WeeksCourse Hours Total
Maximum3.00Lecture Scheduled3.0017.5 max.Lecture Scheduled52.50
Minimum3.00Lab Scheduled06 min.Lab Scheduled0
 Contact DHR0 Contact DHR0
 Contact Total3.00 Contact Total52.50
 
 Non-contact DHR0 Non-contact DHR Total0

 Total Out of Class Hours:  105.00Total Student Learning Hours: 157.50 

Title 5 Category:  AA Degree Applicable
Grading:  Grade or P/NP
Repeatability:  00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP
Also Listed As: 
Formerly: 

Catalog Description:
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An overview of the major periods in world theatre history through significant works of dramatic literature, as well as the global and cultural influences from which they emerged.  Students are introduced to major theatrical styles, artists, design, and technical developments of world theatre from the origins of drama to the contemporary stage. Emphasis is placed on the interrelationship between theatre of different times and cultures, and the historical importance of theatre in society. Attendance at one or more SRJC Theatre Arts Department productions is required.

Prerequisites/Corequisites:


Recommended Preparation:
Course Eligibility for ENGL 1A

Limits on Enrollment:

Schedule of Classes Information
Description: Untitled document
An overview of the major periods in world theatre history through significant works of dramatic literature, as well as the global and cultural influences from which they emerged.  Students are introduced to major theatrical styles, artists, design, and technical developments of world theatre from the origins of drama to the contemporary stage.
(Grade or P/NP)

Prerequisites:
Recommended:Course Eligibility for ENGL 1A
Limits on Enrollment:
Transfer Credit:CSU;UC.
Repeatability:00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP

ARTICULATION, MAJOR, and CERTIFICATION INFORMATION

Associate Degree:Effective:Fall 1981
Inactive: 
 Area:E
H
Humanities
Global Perspective and Environmental Literacy
 
CSU GE:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 C1ArtsFall 1981
 
IGETC:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 3AArtsFall 1981
 
CSU Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 1981Inactive:
 
UC Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 1981Inactive:
 
C-ID:
 CID Descriptor: THTR 113 Theatre History 1 SRJC Equivalent Course(s): THAR1

Certificate/Major Applicable: Both Certificate and Major Applicable



COURSE CONTENT

Outcomes and Objectives:
Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:
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Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:
1.  Demonstrate a general knowledge of the major periods of world theatre,
   including significant movements, forms, artists, and literature.
2.  Integrate knowledge of the larger historic context (social, economic,
   political, geographic, and cultural) with the study of each major
   period in world theatre.
3.  Examine the interconnections between the theatres of different world
   cultures, civilizations, and historic periods.
4.  Compare and contrast basic elements of dramatic structure used in
   significant works from various cultures, civilizations, and periods
   in world theatre.
5.  Conduct basic script analysis and scholarly research in the
   preparation of written critiques, discussions, and artistic projects.
6.  Identify and interpret thematic elements, including common thematic
   threads, within a historical and/or cultural context.
7.  Apply various theories of aesthetic and critical analysis in the
   reading and interpretation of plays.
8.  Analyze the relationship between the methods of production used during
   a script's period of origin and the structure of that script.
9.  Expand critical comprehension through discussion of the literary
   and artistic value of a script, as well as its historical context.
10. Support one's own interpretation of a theatrical script with examples
   drawn from script analysis and research, while recognizing that there
   may be many valid interpretations of the same work.
11. Compare and contrast the present position of theatre in our modern
   United States society to that of past cultures, civilizations, and
   periods in world theatre.

Topics and Scope
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I.    What is Theatre?
     A.  Identifying theatre today
         1.  Functions of theatre today
         2.  Locations of theatre today
         3.  Elements of theatre today
         4.  Relationship between our society and theatre today
     B.  The structure of a historical and cultural survey
         1.  Functions of theatre in different times and cultures
         2.  Locations of theatre in different times and cultures
         3.  Elements of theatre in different times and cultures
         4.  Relationship between different societies and their theatre
II.   The Origins of Theatre
III.  Theatre as Literature: Script Analysis
     A.  How to read a play
     B.  Aristotle's poetics
     C.  Suspension of disbelief and aesthetic distance
     D.  Genres, styles & conventions
     E.  Structural elements of a script
IV.  Theatre Research and Resources
     A.  Basic research techniques
     B.  Introduction to theatre resources
     C.  The role of research in theatre
         1.  For theatre historians and educators
         2.  For dramaturgs
         3.  For theatre artists
Regarding V through XXII below--for each of the following historical
periods and geographic cultures, the class will touch on:
  - Major historical events and cultural movements of the period
  - The theatre's function/relationship to the larger society
  - Who attended the theatre, why, and when
  - Major contributions to world theatre during the period
  - Major artists of the period and/or major works
  - Changes in theatre architecture and design, and the reasons why
  - Relationship of the period's theatre to that of other cultures and
    time periods
The class will also read, analyze, and discuss 8-12 representative works
and major plays corresponding with many of these periods and cultures.]
V.    Classical Greek Theatre
VI.   Classical Roman Theatre
VII.  The Theatre of Asia
     A.  India
     B.  China
     C.  Japan
VIII. Medieval Theatre in Europe
IX.   The Renaissance: Italy
X.    The Renaissance: England
XI.   The Renaissance: The Spanish Golden Age
XII.  The Renaissance: France
XIII. The Theatre of Revolution
     A.  Restoration Theatre
     B.  18th Century European Theatre
     C.  Theatre and Colonialism
XIV.  Theatre of Latin America
XV.   Popular Theatre of 19th Century
     A.  Romanticism
     B.  Melodrama
XVI.  Realism and Naturalism
XVII. Antirealism
     A.  The "isms"
     B.  Epic Theatre
XVIII.U.S. Theatre of the 20th century
     A.  Early 20th century
     B.  Post-war period
     C.  New voices in late century
XIX.  The Musical
XX.   World Theatre of 20th century
     A.  Postmodernism
     B.  New voices in world theatre
XXI.  Africa and the African Diaspora
XXII. World Theatre in the New Millennium

Assignments:
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As a 3-hour lecture course, students will complete 6 hours of homework per
week, which may include:
1.  Reading approximately 30-50 pages per week, including 8-12 plays and
   supplemental material.
2.  Preparing to participate in class exercises and discussions relating
   to the plays read and subjects studied.
3.  Take-home quizzes on assigned reading, assessing students' retention
   and interpretation of material read. Some instructors may choose to
   add in-class quiz questions or require in-class quizzes instead.
4.  Attending 1-3 Theatre Arts department productions and analyzing them
   from a cultural/historical perspective in class discussions.
5.  Writing Assignments - Students will complete 8-10 pages of written
   work over the course of the semester, broken down into 4-5 short
   written assignments.  Examples include:
  A.  Library research assignment, intended to introduce students to
      research techniques relating to the theatre (approx. 2 pages)
  B.  Production critique, analyzing an attended performance using
      historic aesthetic criteria, or comparing/contrasting it with
      attending a play during another cultural/historical period studied.
  C.  Research and create an informative biography handout (1-2 pages) or
      small classroom display (approx. 11"x17") on an important figure
      from world theatre history not covered in the text. (Each student,
      or team, is assigned a different individual to research.)
  D.  Antirealistic treatment for a realistic play - each student, or
      team, creatively re-interprets a realistic play read by the class,
      applying concepts of an antirealistic style.  (Approx. 2 pages.)
  E.  Written summary, with bibliography, for the creative project (see
      #6. below)  Approx. 2-3 pages.
6. Creative Project:  Each student completes a creative project relating
  to the historical/cultural focus of the class.  Some examples include
  performing a scene from a period studied, writing a 10-minute one-act
  play in an antirealistic style, conceptualizing a historical costume or
  set design, or building a model of a historical theatre.  Evaluated on
  preparation, research, and historic/script analysis applications, not
  skill.  (8-10 hours of preparation, with documention.  See #5E. above.)
7. Studying for the following:
  A.  Midterm Exam (assessment up to midpoint)
  B.  Final Exam (assessment from midpoint to final)

Methods of Evaluation/Basis of Grade.
Writing: Assessment tools that demonstrate writing skill and/or require students to select, organize and explain ideas in writing.Writing
20 - 35%
Written homework, Research papers, Project summary
Problem solving: Assessment tools, other than exams, that demonstrate competence in computational or non-computational problem solving skills.Problem Solving
0 - 0%
None
Skill Demonstrations: All skill-based and physical demonstrations used for assessment purposes including skill performance exams.Skill Demonstrations
0 - 0%
None
Exams: All forms of formal testing, other than skill performance exams.Exams
50 - 60%
Multiple choice, True/false, Matching items, Completion, Short answer, essay, take-home/in-class quizzes
Other: Includes any assessment tools that do not logically fit into the above categories.Other Category
5 - 25%
Attendance and participation, creative project


Representative Textbooks and Materials:
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The Longman Anthology of Drama and Theater:  A Global Perspective (Compact
 Edition).  Greenwald, Michael, Schultz, Roger, and Pomo, Roberto D.
 Longman: 2002.

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