SRJC Course Outlines

10/31/2020 12:18:00 PMPHIL 9 Course Outline as of Fall 1999

Changed Course
CATALOG INFORMATION

Discipline and Nbr:  PHIL 9Title:  POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY  
Full Title:  Political Philosophy
Last Reviewed:10/23/2017

UnitsCourse Hours per Week Nbr of WeeksCourse Hours Total
Maximum3.00Lecture Scheduled3.0017.5 max.Lecture Scheduled52.50
Minimum3.00Lab Scheduled017.5 min.Lab Scheduled0
 Contact DHR0 Contact DHR0
 Contact Total3.00 Contact Total52.50
 
 Non-contact DHR0 Non-contact DHR Total0

 Total Out of Class Hours:  105.00Total Student Learning Hours: 157.50 

Title 5 Category:  AA Degree Applicable
Grading:  Grade or P/NP
Repeatability:  00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP
Also Listed As: 
Formerly: 

Catalog Description:
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An examination of philosophical concepts such as liberty, equality, rights, justice, and democracy.  Typical approaches will use these and other concepts to address the nature of government and citizenship, attempting to understand the U.S. Constitution, civil rights, and contemporary issues such as affirmative action and the welfare state. These concepts will be explored through the thought and experience of diverse groups within the United States.

Prerequisites/Corequisites:


Recommended Preparation:
Eligibility for Engl 1A.

Limits on Enrollment:

Schedule of Classes Information
Description: Untitled document
The examination of basic concepts in political philosophy such as liberty, equality, rights, justice and democracy.  These concepts will be explored through the thought and experience of diverse groups within the United States.
(Grade or P/NP)

Prerequisites:
Recommended:Eligibility for Engl 1A.
Limits on Enrollment:
Transfer Credit:CSU;UC.
Repeatability:00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP

ARTICULATION, MAJOR, and CERTIFICATION INFORMATION

Associate Degree:Effective:Fall 1996
Inactive: 
 Area:E
G
Humanities
American Cultures/Ethnic Studies
 
CSU GE:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 C2HumanitiesFall 1997
 
IGETC:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 3BHumanitiesFall 1997
 
CSU Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 1996Inactive:
 
UC Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 1996Inactive:
 
C-ID:

Certificate/Major Applicable: Major Applicable Course



COURSE CONTENT

Outcomes and Objectives:
Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:
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The student will:
 1.  Demonstrate knowledge of basic concepts of political philosophy,
     such as liberty, equality, justice, rights, and the legitimate
     government. Demonstrate the ability to understand and analyze
     concepts which are prerequisites for understanding political
     thought in a diverse society:  race, ethnicity, gender, class,
     culture and religion.
 2.  Demonstrate familiarity with the political philosophy of several
     prominent classical or contemporary philosophers, including those
     who address issues and views of diverse groups in the United States.
 3.  Demonstrate the ability to apply these concepts and theories to
     practical issues such as understanding the U.S. Constitution, civil
     rights, affirmative action, welfare, multiculturalism, and
     community.
 4.  Demonstrate an understanding of how these concepts and principles of
     political philosophy, especially where they involve issues of social
     justice, equality, liberty and citizenship, have been involved in
     the historical and present experience of at least three of the
     following groups:  African American, Asian American, Chicano/Latino
     American, European American, Indigenous Peoples of the Americas, and
     Americans of Middle Eastern origin.

Topics and Scope
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1. Topics:  Classes will typically cover the basic concepts and issues of
political philosophy.  These include rights, liberty, governmental
authority and legitimacy, interpreting constitutions, citizenship,
justification of communal values, finding unity within diversity, and
respect for diversity.
2. Scope:  The focus of the course is on the concepts and issues of
political philosophy which are relevant for a student understanding and
reflecting on contemporary political issues.  Historical background will
be presented in order to provide for a good understanding and appreciation
of contemporary issues. The experience of at least three of following
groups will be emphasized:  African American, Asian American
Chicano/Latino American, European American, Indigenous Peoples of the
Americas, and Americans of Middle Eastern origin.
3. Sequence:  The sequence may vary according to the instructor and the
needs of the students.  A typical sequence is as follows:
  1. Introduction:  the nature of philosophical reflection and the
     special issues of political philosophy.
  2. The basic issue of governmental legitimacy.  Various theories about
     what justifies state power over individuals.
  3. The rights of the individual:  liberty, human rights, political
     rights, negative and positive rights.
  4. Rights and responsibilities involved in citizenship.
  5. Theories of constitutional interpretation.
  6. Common, shared values:  procedural values and substantive values.
     What procedural values are necessary to hold a community together?
     What substantive values are necessary within a society?
  7. Issues of diversity and community within a society, individual and
     group identity and dignity.
  8. Systematic political philosophies and differing views of human
     nature and human society:  conservatism, liberalism,
     communitarianism, democratic socialism, Confucian political ideals.

Assignments:
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While varying, assignments for Philosophy 9 typically involve:
1.  Regularly assigned reading from course texts.
2.  Regular multiple choice and/or short essay quizzes covering the
   assigned readings.
3.  Essays and/or exams.  Exams will include essay questions.  Papers
   typically will be two to ten pages.
4.  Final examination involving true/false, multiple choice, fill-in,
   and essay questions.

Methods of Evaluation/Basis of Grade.
Writing: Assessment tools that demonstrate writing skill and/or require students to select, organize and explain ideas in writing.Writing
50 - 85%
Written homework, Essay exams, Term papers
Problem solving: Assessment tools, other than exams, that demonstrate competence in computational or non-computational problem solving skills.Problem Solving
0 - 0%
None
Skill Demonstrations: All skill-based and physical demonstrations used for assessment purposes including skill performance exams.Skill Demonstrations
0 - 0%
None
Exams: All forms of formal testing, other than skill performance exams.Exams
10 - 45%
Multiple choice, True/false, FILL-IN
Other: Includes any assessment tools that do not logically fit into the above categories.Other Category
5 - 20%
ATTENDANCE AND/OR PARTICIPATION


Representative Textbooks and Materials:
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CONTEMPORARY POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY:  AN INTRODUCTION, Will Kymlicka,
Oxford, pb., 1995.
SOCIAL JUSTICE IN A DIVERSE SOCIETY, Rite Manning and Rene Trujillo,
Mayfield, 1996.
THINKING ABOUT RACE, Naomi Zack, Wadsworth, 1998.
AN INTRODUCTION TO POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY, Jonathan Wolff, Oxford, 1996.
AN INTRODUCTION TO MODERN POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY:  THE DEMOCRATIC VISION OF
POLITICS, Lesley Jacobs, Prentice Hall, 1997.
RACE MATTERS, Cornell West, Vintage Books, 1994.
MULTICULTURAL CITIZENSHIP:  A LIBERAL THEORY OF MINORITY RIGHTS, Will
Kymlicka, Oxford, pb., 1995.

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