SRJC Course Outlines

4/20/2024 9:05:29 AMENGL 1A Course Outline as of Fall 2002

Changed Course
CATALOG INFORMATION

Discipline and Nbr:  ENGL 1ATitle:  READING & COMP  
Full Title:  Reading & Composition
Last Reviewed:10/22/2018

UnitsCourse Hours per Week Nbr of WeeksCourse Hours Total
Maximum4.00Lecture Scheduled4.0017.5 max.Lecture Scheduled70.00
Minimum4.00Lab Scheduled08 min.Lab Scheduled0
 Contact DHR0 Contact DHR0
 Contact Total4.00 Contact Total70.00
 
 Non-contact DHR0 Non-contact DHR Total0

 Total Out of Class Hours:  140.00Total Student Learning Hours: 210.00 

Title 5 Category:  AA Degree Applicable
Grading:  Grade Only
Repeatability:  00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP
Also Listed As: 
Formerly: 

Catalog Description:
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Critical reading and discussion of works in various literary forms. Composition predominantly of reasoned and reflective prose. Content and emphasis of particular sections specified in the English Department's course description bulletin "A Hundred Doors" issued every year.

Prerequisites/Corequisites:
ENGL 100B or ENGL 100


Recommended Preparation:

Limits on Enrollment:

Schedule of Classes Information
Description: Untitled document
Critical reading & discussion of various literary forms. Composition predominantly of reasoned & reflective prose.
(Grade Only)

Prerequisites:ENGL 100B or ENGL 100
Recommended:
Limits on Enrollment:
Transfer Credit:CSU;UC.
Repeatability:00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP

ARTICULATION, MAJOR, and CERTIFICATION INFORMATION

Associate Degree:Effective:Fall 1981
Inactive: 
 Area:A
English Composition
 
CSU GE:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 A2Written CommunicationFall 1981
 
IGETC:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 1AEnglish CompositionFall 1981
 
CSU Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 1981Inactive:
 
UC Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 1981Inactive:
 
C-ID:
 CID Descriptor: ENGL 100 College Composition SRJC Equivalent Course(s): ENGL1A OR EMLS10

Certificate/Major Applicable: Not Certificate/Major Applicable



COURSE CONTENT

Outcomes and Objectives:
At the conclusion of this course, the student should be able to:
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READING - From expository essay and argumentative essays at or above
grade 13 level, students will:
1.  Identify the main idea or thesis.
2.  Identify the sequencing or order of the ideas presented.
3.  Explain how the writer supports and illustrates ideas and connect
   them to the thesis.
4.  Paraphrase and summarize paragraphs and essays.
5.  Annotate an essay with appropriate comments.
6.  Identify the stylistic features of an essay.
7.  Identify an essay's tone.
8.  Distinguish between literal and inferential information and identify
   the use of assumptions and biases.
9.  Identify argumentative techniques and recognize logical fallacies.
10. Identify their opinions and assumptions in relation to reading
   material.
WRITING - Students will:
1.  Write 6,000 to 8,000 words in expository and argumentative essays,
   each with a clearly identifiable thesis.
2.  Organize their essays, paragraphs, and sentences logically and
   coherently.
3.  Show development in paragraphs with concrete, appropriate, and
relevant details.
4.  Write essays which express a mature attitude toward their subject
   with a consistent and appropriate point of view.
5.  Write argumentative essays responding to opposing arguments and
   avoiding logical fallacies.
6.  Revise their prose for clarity, precision, and variety of sentences;
   correct diction; and appropriate voice.
7.  Recognize and correct errors in punctuation, grammar, and spelling.
8.  Demonstrate familiarity with elementary library research techniques
   and with the basic reference works and facilities of the college
   library.

Topics and Scope
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READING-
Students will:
1. Read a number of essays during the semester with emphasis
   on critical reading involving analysis, evaluation, and synthesis
   of ideas from several essays/authors,
2.  Discuss readings in order to examine and learn the above objectives,
2. Read/study/analyze the English Department's Work of Literary Merit
   for the particular semester.
WRITING-
Students will:
1. Write significant number of essays during the semester of various
   lengths, amounting to 6,000 to 8,000 words, primarily narrative/
   descriptive but will also write expository/informative and
   argumentative/persuasive prose,
2. Use revision skills frequently taught using writers' workshop methods
   or individual conferences/tutorials.

Assignments:
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WRITING:
1.  Weekly out-of-class essays or out-of-class essays for which
   drafting/revision equivalent to a weekly essay are required.
2.  In-class essays in response to reading essays or the Work of Literary
   Merit.
3.  A research paper or essays for which library resources are used.
4.  Specific exercises to work with aspects of writing, such as thesis
   invention; organization; development; style; tone; diction; etc.
5.  Specific exercises in paraphrasing, summarization, annotation,
   recognizing logical fallacies, etc.
6.  A journal in which students practice writing to various topics and
   responding to assigned course readings.

Methods of Evaluation/Basis of Grade.
Writing: Assessment tools that demonstrate writing skill and/or require students to select, organize and explain ideas in writing.Writing
70 - 95%
Written homework, Reading reports, Term papers, READING/WRITING JOURNALS
Problem solving: Assessment tools, other than exams, that demonstrate competence in computational or non-computational problem solving skills.Problem Solving
0 - 0%
None
Skill Demonstrations: All skill-based and physical demonstrations used for assessment purposes including skill performance exams.Skill Demonstrations
0 - 0%
None
Exams: All forms of formal testing, other than skill performance exams.Exams
5 - 20%
Multiple choice, Matching items, Completion, SHORT ANSWER
Other: Includes any assessment tools that do not logically fit into the above categories.Other Category
0 - 15%
ATTENDANCE/PARTICIPATION


Representative Textbooks and Materials:
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Atwan, Robert. TEN ON TEN, St. Martin's Press, 2000.
Barthomolme, David. WAYS OF READING, St. Martin's Press, 1998
Colombo, Gary, ed.. REREADING AMERICA, St. Martin's Press, 1998
Garrison, Roger H. HOW A WRITER WORKS, Addison-Wesley, 1985.
Hacker, Diana. A WRITER'S REFERENCE, St. Martin's Press, 1998.
Smart, William. EIGHT MODERN ESSAYISTS, St. Martin's Press, 1994.
Work of Literary Merit (W.O.L.M):
Each semester the English Department selects a Work of Literary
Merit for all 1A students. Typically, at least four faculty
lectures are given and special library resources provided for
this project.
The following have been works studied.
CANDIDE, Voltaire.
THE MAYOR OF CASTORBRIDGE, Hardy.
HENDERSON THE RAIN KING, Bellow.
AS I LAY DYING, Faulkner.
THE HORSE'S MOUTH, Cary.
PRIDE AND PREJUDICE, Austen.
A GATHERING OF OLD MEN, Gaines.
THE TEMPEST and AS YOU LIKE IT, Shakespeare.
THE MILAGRO BEANFIELD WARS, Nichols.
THE ADVENTURES OF HUCKLEBERRY FINN, Twain.
TO THE LIGHTHOUSE, Woolf.
MADAME BOVARY, Flaubert.
HEART OF DARKNESS, Conrad
THE THINGS THEY CARRIED, O'Brien
"GIMPEL THE FOOL" AND OTHER STORIES, Singer
ALICE IN WONDERLAND, Carroll
BELOVED and SONG OF SOLOMON, Morrison
INVISIBLE MAN, Ellison
WAITING FOR THE BARBARIANS, Coetzee
DUBLINERS, Joyce
SNOW FALLING ON CEDARS, Guterson
THE WOMAN WARRIOR, Kingston
CEREMONY, Silko

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