SRJC Course Outlines

6/22/2024 10:13:38 AMPSYCH 34 Course Outline as of Fall 2024

Changed Course
CATALOG INFORMATION

Discipline and Nbr:  PSYCH 34Title:  PREJUDICE/DISCRIMINATION  
Full Title:  The Psychology of Prejudice and Discrimination
Last Reviewed:10/9/2023

UnitsCourse Hours per Week Nbr of WeeksCourse Hours Total
Maximum3.00Lecture Scheduled3.0017.5 max.Lecture Scheduled52.50
Minimum3.00Lab Scheduled06 min.Lab Scheduled0
 Contact DHR0 Contact DHR0
 Contact Total3.00 Contact Total52.50
 
 Non-contact DHR0 Non-contact DHR Total0

 Total Out of Class Hours:  105.00Total Student Learning Hours: 157.50 

Title 5 Category:  AA Degree Applicable
Grading:  Grade or P/NP
Repeatability:  00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP
Also Listed As: 
Formerly: 

Catalog Description:
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This course covers the psychology of prejudice and discrimination based on race, biological sex and gender, sexual orientation, class, age, and ability including aspects of the mind, culture, and society that lead to the development of prejudiced behaviors and attitudes. Students will learn about topics including bias, stereotypes, racism, privilege, intersectionality and systems, inter-group conflict, consequences of prejudice and discrimination, and strategies to develop the qualities needed for transforming oppressive systems and ourselves. Topics will be covered through methods including lectures, activities, storytelling, media, and discussions.

Prerequisites/Corequisites:


Recommended Preparation:
Eligibility for ENGL 1A or equivalent

Limits on Enrollment:

Schedule of Classes Information
Description: Untitled document
This course covers the psychology of prejudice and discrimination based on race, biological sex and gender, sexual orientation, class, age, and ability including aspects of the mind, culture, and society that lead to the development of prejudiced behaviors and attitudes. Students will learn about topics including bias, stereotypes, racism, privilege, intersectionality and systems, inter-group conflict, consequences of prejudice and discrimination, and strategies to develop the qualities needed for transforming oppressive systems and ourselves. Topics will be covered through methods including lectures, activities, storytelling, media, and discussions.
(Grade or P/NP)

Prerequisites:
Recommended:Eligibility for ENGL 1A or equivalent
Limits on Enrollment:
Transfer Credit:CSU;UC.
Repeatability:00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP

ARTICULATION, MAJOR, and CERTIFICATION INFORMATION

Associate Degree:Effective:Fall 1981
Inactive: 
 Area:D
G
Social and Behavioral Sciences
American Cultures/Ethnic Studies
 
CSU GE:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 ELifelong Learning and Self DevelopmentFall 1981
 
IGETC:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 4Social and Behavioral ScienceFall 1981
 4IPsychology  
 
CSU Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 1981Inactive:
 
UC Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 1981Inactive:
 
C-ID:
 CID Descriptor: SOCI 150 Introduction to Race and Ethnicity SRJC Equivalent Course(s): PSYC34 OR SOC30

Certificate/Major Applicable: Both Certificate and Major Applicable



COURSE CONTENT

Student Learning Outcomes:
At the conclusion of this course, the student should be able to:
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1. Explain psychological theories about the development of stereotypes, prejudice, and discrimination and how those are experienced by different minority groups.
2. Identify how prejudice and discrimination are psychosocially constructed and may be transformed.
3. Evaluate the costs of prejudice and discrimination.
 

Objectives: Untitled document
At the conclusion of this course, the student should be able to:
1. Define major concepts in the psychological study of prejudice and discrimination.
2. Identify major methods used to study prejudice and discrimination in psychology.
3. Understand the factors that contribute to stereotype formation.
4. Examine the factors that contribute to stereotype activation and application.
5. Analyze how individual differences in values and social ideologies contribute to prejudice and discrimination.
6. Evaluate how prejudice develops in children.
7. Define different types of discrimination.
8. Recognize patterns of discrimination and the consequences experienced by specific racial groups.
9. Recognize patterns of discrimination and the consequences experienced by specific groups based on biological sex, gender, sexual orientation, age, ability, economic class, and visibility of group membership.
10. Examine individual and group interventions that may reduce prejudice and discrimination.

Topics and Scope
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I. Introduction of Concepts
     A. Understand social categorization
    B. Distinguish between stereotypes, prejudice, and discrimination
    C. Understand privilege, intersectionality
II. Research Methods
    A. Surveys, observations, correlational studies, experiments
    B. Deception
    C. Measuring attitudes
    D. Neuroscience
    E. Sampling and biased samples
    F. Reflection on the structural racism in psychology
III. Stereotype Formation
     A. Social categories
    B. Ingroups and outgroups
    C. Minimal group paradigm
    D. Social role theory
    E. Reinforcing stereotypes
IV. Stereotype Activation and Application
    A. Difference between activation and application
    B. Factors that influence stereotype activation
    C. Factors that influence stereotype application
    D. Examples of bias
    E. Impacts of bias
V. Individual Differences in Prejudice
    A. Individualism and egalitarianism
    B. Authoritarianism and social dominance orientation
    C. Links between values and ideologies and prejudice
VI. Development of Prejudice in Children
    A. Awareness of social categories by age
    B. The doll test
    C. Trajectory of development of prejudice among minority and majority group children
     D. Stereotype development by age
    E. Theories to explain the development of prejudice
    F. Influence of family, peers, and media
    G. Strategies for reducing prejudice in children
VII. Types of Discrimination
    A. Blatant and subtle discrimination
    B. Hate crimes
    C. Microaggressions
    D. Institutional discrimination
    E. Stereotype fit and stereotype threat
VIII. Patterns and Costs of Racial Discrimination
    A. African Americans
    B. Latinx Americans
    C. Native Americans
    D. Asian Americans
    E. Pacific Islander Americans
    F. Historical context
    G. Explore specific stereotypes for each racial group
    H. Policing
     I. Minority stress model
     J. Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) by race
     K. Impacts on self-esteem, mental health, physical health
     L. Colorism
     M. Theory of Invisibility
     N. Pan-Indianism
IX. Patterns and Costs of Discrimination Based on Biological Sex, Gender, Sexual Orientation, Age, Ability, Economic Class, Appearance, and Religion
     A. Common stereotypes and resulting forms of prejudice and discrimination
     B. Gender belief systems
     C. Gender polarization
     D. Role congruity theory
     E. Factors that predict attitudes towards people in these categories
     F. Factors that predict prejudice and discrimination against people with disabilities
X. Reducing Prejudice and Discrimination
    A. Intergroup contact theory
    B. Extended contact, imagined contact, and media/parasocial contact hypotheses
    C. Institutional focus on behavior instead of thoughts to reduce discrimination
     D. Stereotype suppression
    E. Self-regulation model
    F. Allyship

Assignments:
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1. Weekly reading (approximately 35-70 pages) and discuss assigned material from the textbook or supplements
2. Writing assignments (2 or more. Minimum of 1,250 words total)
3. Quizzes and exams (2 or more)
4. Other assignments, such as:
     A. Presentations
     B. Group projects may also be assigned.

Methods of Evaluation/Basis of Grade.
Writing: Assessment tools that demonstrate writing skill and/or require students to select, organize and explain ideas in writing.Writing
30 - 60%
Writing assignments
Problem solving: Assessment tools, other than exams, that demonstrate competence in computational or non-computational problem solving skills.Problem Solving
0 - 0%
None
Skill Demonstrations: All skill-based and physical demonstrations used for assessment purposes including skill performance exams.Skill Demonstrations
0 - 0%
None
Exams: All forms of formal testing, other than skill performance exams.Exams
40 - 60%
Quizzes and exams
Other: Includes any assessment tools that do not logically fit into the above categories.Other Category
0 - 10%
Other assignments


Representative Textbooks and Materials:
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The Meaning of Difference: American Constructions of Race, Sex and Gender, Social Class, Sexual Orientation, and Disability. 7th ed. Rosenblum, Karen and Travis, Toni-Michelle. McGraw Hill. 2015 (classic).
The Psychology of Prejudice and Discrimination. 4th ed. Whitley Jr., Bernard, Kite, Mary, and Wagner, Lisa S. Routledge. 2022.
Race, Class, and Gender in the United States: An Integrated Study. 11th ed. Rothenberg, Paula S. and Accomando, Christina Hsu. Worth Publishers. 2019.
Biased: Uncovering the Hidden Prejudice That Shapes What We See, Think, and Do. Eberhardt, Jennifer. Penguin Books. 2019.
My Grandmother's Hands: Racialized Trauma and the Pathway to Mending Our Hearts and Bodies. Menakem, Resmaa. Central Recovery Press. 2017 (classic).
Nice Racism: How Progressive White People Perpetuate Racial Harm. DiAngelo, Robin. Beacon Press. 2021.
 
Other Materials:
Roberts, S. et al. (2020). Racial inequality in psychological research: Trends of the past and recommendations for the future. Perspectives on Psychological Science, 15(6), 1295-1309.
Rizzo, M. et al. (2022). Developmental origins of anti-Black bias in White children in the United States: Exposure to and beliefs about racial inequality. PNAS, 119(47), 1-8.
Roberts, S. & Rizzo, M. (2020). The psychology of American racism. American Psychologist, 76(3), 475-487.
Goff, P. et al. (2014). The essence of innocence: Consequences of dehumanizing Black children. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 106(4), 526-545.
Gomez-Aguinaga, B., et al. (2021). Immigration and gender as social determinants of mental health during the COVID-19 outbreak: The case of US Latina/os. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 18.
Davis-Delano, L., et al. (2020). The psychosocial effects of Native American mascots: a comprehensive review of empirical research findings. Race, Ethnicity, and Education.
Cheryan, S. & Bodenhausen, G. (2000). When positive stereotypes threaten intellectual performance: The psychological hazards of "Model Minority" status. Psychological Science, 11(5), 399-402.
Alang, S., et al. (2021). Police encounters as stressors: Associations with depression and anxiety across race. Socius: Sociological research for a dynamic world.
Mullainathan, S. & Shafir, E. (2014). Freeing up intelligence. Scientific American Mind, January/February, 58-63.

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