SRJC Course Outlines

6/22/2024 7:48:06 AMPHYS 11 Course Outline as of Fall 2024

Changed Course
CATALOG INFORMATION

Discipline and Nbr:  PHYS 11Title:  CONCEPTUAL PHYSICS  
Full Title:  Conceptual Physics
Last Reviewed:4/10/2023

UnitsCourse Hours per Week Nbr of WeeksCourse Hours Total
Maximum4.00Lecture Scheduled3.0017.5 max.Lecture Scheduled52.50
Minimum4.00Lab Scheduled3.008 min.Lab Scheduled52.50
 Contact DHR0 Contact DHR0
 Contact Total6.00 Contact Total105.00
 
 Non-contact DHR0 Non-contact DHR Total0

 Total Out of Class Hours:  105.00Total Student Learning Hours: 210.00 

Title 5 Category:  AA Degree Applicable
Grading:  Grade or P/NP
Repeatability:  00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP
Also Listed As: 
Formerly: 

Catalog Description:
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In this course, students will be introduced to basic concepts and principles in physics, the role of experimentation and inquiry, and relationships between physics, other disciplines, and society.

Prerequisites/Corequisites:
Completion of MATH 156 or MATH 154 or MATH 155 or AB705 placement into Math Tier 3 or higher


Recommended Preparation:
Eligibility for ENGL 1A or equivalent

Limits on Enrollment:

Schedule of Classes Information
Description: Untitled document
In this course, students will be introduced to basic concepts and principles in physics, the role of experimentation and inquiry, and relationships between physics, other disciplines, and society.
(Grade or P/NP)

Prerequisites:Completion of MATH 156 or MATH 154 or MATH 155 or AB705 placement into Math Tier 3 or higher
Recommended:Eligibility for ENGL 1A or equivalent
Limits on Enrollment:
Transfer Credit:CSU;UC.
Repeatability:00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP

ARTICULATION, MAJOR, and CERTIFICATION INFORMATION

Associate Degree:Effective:Fall 2011
Inactive: 
 Area:C
Natural Sciences
 
CSU GE:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 B1Physical ScienceFall 2011
 B3Laboratory Activity  
 
IGETC:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 5APhysical SciencesFall 2011
 5CFulfills Lab Requirement  
 
CSU Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 2011Inactive:
 
UC Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 2011Inactive:
 
C-ID:

Certificate/Major Applicable: Major Applicable Course



COURSE CONTENT

Student Learning Outcomes:
At the conclusion of this course, the student should be able to:
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1. Explain the basic principles underlying the physics topics in the course.
2. Apply scientific reasoning skills to ask questions, perform systematic measurements, and develop and test models to investigate physical phenomena.
 

Objectives: Untitled document
At the conclusion of this course, the student should be able to:
1. Articulate the process of science as an iterative inquiry process including: observation; developing, testing, and improving models; collaboration and peer review; and generalizing and theory building.
2. Describe how physics is related to and interacts with other disciplines as well as how interdisciplinary collaborations have led to modern achievements and advances.
3. Explain how physics influences and is influenced by society via policy, ethics, and technology.
4. Communicate their knowledge using prose and mathematics.
5. Apply physics to solve problems and predict outcomes in the everyday world.
 
Laboratory objective:
1. Apply scientific skills such as making measurements, finding patterns, devising models, and testing those models on physical phenomena.

Topics and Scope
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I. Physics as a Scientific Endeavor
   A. Scientific process
   B. Physics and other disciplines: relationship of physics to other disciplines, interdisciplinary collaborations, and achievements
   C. Physics and society: technology, ethics, and public policy
II. Foundational Mechanics
   A. Motion: time, position, velocity, acceleration
   B. Interactions: forces, Newton's laws of motion
   C. Energy: types of energy and conservation of energy
III. Laboratory Skills
   A. Using the metric system to express measurements
   B. Using computerized (motion detectors, force probes, etc.) and non-computerized (stopwatches, meter sticks, etc.) tools to make measurements of physical phenomena
   C. Recording and displaying data using tables and graphs
   D. Analyzing and interpreting results, including the role of measurement uncertainty
 
Instructor will select at least two (2)  topics from below to form a coherent storyline for the course:
 
IV. Mechanics
   A. Universal gravitation: circular motion, satellites, and astronomical bodies
   B. Momentum: conservation of momentum
   C. Rotational motion: conservation of angular momentum, and torque
V. Electricity and Magnetism
   A. Electrostatics: conservation of charge, electric fields and forces, and electric potential
   B. Electric current: direct current (DC) circuits, Ohm's law
   C. Magnetism: magnetic fields and forces, and ferromagnetic materials
   D. Induction: electromagnetic induction, generators, and motors
VI. Thermodynamics
   A. Heat and temperature
   B. First law of thermodynamics: conservation of energy, specific heat, heat transfer, and phase changes
   C. Second law of thermodynamics: entropy
VII. Waves
   A. Wave phenomena: oscillations, standing waves, reflection, refraction, interference, and diffraction
   B. Sound: Doppler effect and musical sounds
   C. Light: mirrors and lenses, and color
VIII. Structure of Matter
   A. Phases of matter: solids, liquids, and gases
   B. Atomic nature of matter: periodic table and the structure of the atom
   C. Atomic physics: radioactivity, nuclear processes
IX. Special and General Relativity
   A. Special relativity: Newton and Einstein time, relativistic effects, and the correspondence principle
   B. General relativity: the equivalence principle, perspective on gravity, and applications to cosmology
   C. Experimental evidence
X. Quantum Mechanics
   A. Foundational experiments and observations: the photoelectric effect and the double-slit experiment
   B. Wave-particle duality
   C. Uncertainty principle
   D. Quantum model of the atom

Assignments:
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Lecture-Related Assignments:
1. Reading assignments (approximately one textbook chapter per week)
2. Homework assignments (12-16)
3. Quizzes (5-16)
4. Exams (2-4)
5. Final exam
 
Lab-Related Assignments:
1. Laboratory readings and reports (12-17)
2. Laboratory exam(s) (0-3)
3. Special project (0-1), such as:
    A. Demonstrations
    B. Video presentations

Methods of Evaluation/Basis of Grade.
Writing: Assessment tools that demonstrate writing skill and/or require students to select, organize and explain ideas in writing.Writing
10 - 30%
Lab reports
Problem solving: Assessment tools, other than exams, that demonstrate competence in computational or non-computational problem solving skills.Problem Solving
10 - 30%
Homework assignments
Skill Demonstrations: All skill-based and physical demonstrations used for assessment purposes including skill performance exams.Skill Demonstrations
0 - 0%
None
Exams: All forms of formal testing, other than skill performance exams.Exams
40 - 70%
Exams; laboratory exam(s); quizzes; final exam
Other: Includes any assessment tools that do not logically fit into the above categories.Other Category
0 - 10%
Special project, class participation


Representative Textbooks and Materials:
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Conceptual Physics. 12th ed. Hewitt, Paul. Addison Wesley. 2014 (classic).
Conceptual Physics Fundamentals. Hewitt, Paul. Addison Wesley. 2008 (classic).
Conceptual Physics Laboratory Manual. Hewitt, Paul. Addison Wesley. 2008 (classic).

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