SRJC Course Outlines

2/22/2024 7:00:27 PMCONS 101 Course Outline as of Fall 2022

New Course (First Version)
CATALOG INFORMATION

Discipline and Nbr:  CONS 101Title:  INTRO TO CONST INDUSTRY  
Full Title:  Introduction to the Construction Industry
Last Reviewed:9/11/2023

UnitsCourse Hours per Week Nbr of WeeksCourse Hours Total
Maximum3.00Lecture Scheduled3.0017.5 max.Lecture Scheduled52.50
Minimum3.00Lab Scheduled06 min.Lab Scheduled0
 Contact DHR0 Contact DHR0
 Contact Total3.00 Contact Total52.50
 
 Non-contact DHR0 Non-contact DHR Total0

 Total Out of Class Hours:  105.00Total Student Learning Hours: 157.50 

Title 5 Category:  AA Degree Applicable
Grading:  Grade Only
Repeatability:  00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP
Also Listed As: 
Formerly: 

Catalog Description:
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In this course, students will be introduced to an overview of the construction industry, including careers within the construction industry, roles and responsibilities within a construction firm, the construction project lifecycle and management of that process, safety issues, related agencies and organizations, and an introduction to basic construction hand and power tools. Field trips will be required.

Prerequisites/Corequisites:


Recommended Preparation:
Eligibility for ENGL 1A (or ESL 10) or equivalent

Limits on Enrollment:

Schedule of Classes Information
Description: Untitled document
In this course, students will be introduced to an overview of the construction industry, including careers within the construction industry, roles and responsibilities within a construction firm, the construction project lifecycle and management of that process, safety issues, related agencies and organizations, and an introduction to basic construction hand and power tools. Field trips will be required.
(Grade Only)

Prerequisites:
Recommended:Eligibility for ENGL 1A (or ESL 10) or equivalent
Limits on Enrollment:
Transfer Credit:
Repeatability:00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP

ARTICULATION, MAJOR, and CERTIFICATION INFORMATION

Associate Degree:Effective:Inactive:
 Area:
 
CSU GE:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 
IGETC:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 
CSU Transfer:Effective:Inactive:
 
UC Transfer:Effective:Inactive:
 
C-ID:

Certificate/Major Applicable: Certificate Applicable Course



COURSE CONTENT

Student Learning Outcomes:
At the conclusion of this course, the student should be able to:
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1. Describe the constituent roles of and responsibilities for members of a construction firm.
2. Identify potential workplace hazards and propose potential mitigation steps to prevent injury or illness.
3. Identify common workplace tools and describe their intended use and operation.
4. Explain the general process by which building projects typically progress from inception to completion.
5. Identify the impact of laws, rules, and regulations on the construction industry.
 

Objectives: Untitled document
At the conclusion of this course, the student should be able to:
1. Examine the varied roles of and responsibilities for different members of a construction firm.
2. Discuss issues of safety and prevention of injury or illness due to potential hazards of the workplace environment for construction workers.
3. Attend field trips to tool vendors and rental yards to observe and handle tools commonly used throughout the construction industry.
4. Review and research completed or in-progress construction projects.
5. Calculate lengths, areas, and volumes from measurements taken from architectural drawings as typically used in the construction industry.

Topics and Scope
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I.  Overview of the Construction Industry
    A.  History of construction and construction trades
         1.  Brief historical overview
         2.  Seasonality
         3.  Impact from economy
         4.  Finances
   B.  Types of construction
         1.  Residential
         2.  Commercial
         3.  Civil
II.  Introduction to Career Roles and Responsibilities
    A.  Construction firm types and organization
         1.  General
         2.  Subcontractor
    B.  Union versus non-union firms
    C.  Examples of local firms
    D.  Scalar responsibilities/duties
    E.  Project client/owner types
        1.  Private individuals
        2.  Corporate entities
        3.  Public agencies
    F.  Construction firm employees
         1.  Craftsperson
              a.  Laborer
              b.  Apprentice
              c.  Journeyperson
         2.  Project manager
         3.  Accountant
         4.  Superintendent
         5.  Scheduler
         6.  Construction manager
         7.  Estimator
         8.  Dispatcher
         9.  Field engineer
         10.  Safety personnel
III.  Allied Professionals, Businesses, and Agencies
    A.  Designers
         1.  Architect
         2.  Landscape architect
         3.  Interior designer
         4.  Building Designer
    B.  Engineers
         1.  Geotechnical
         2.  Civil/Survey
         3.  Structural
         4.  Mechanical
         5.  Electrical and lighting
         6.  Acoustical
    C.  Project consultants
         1.  Sustainability and Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED)
         2.  Energy compliance
         3.  Historical/cultural
         4.  Community liaison
         5.  Certified Accessibility Specialist (CASp)
    D.  Materials/equipment suppliers
         1.  Equipment rental
         2.  Sanitation equipment
         3.  Materials suppliers
    E.  Insurance and bonding agents
    F.  Project funding agencies
    G.  Attorneys
    H.  Governmental agencies
         1.  Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)
         2.  California Contractors State Licensing Board (CSLB)
         3.  Local building and planning departments and officials
         4.  Division of the State Architect (DSA)
         5.  International Code Council (ICC)
         6.  California Administrative Code (CAC) and the California Building Code (CBC)
    I. Industry support organizations
         1.  Builder's exchanges: North Coast Builder's Exchange (NCBE)
         2.  California Building Industry Association (CBIA)
         3.  Construction Specifications Institute (CSI)
         4.  The Associated General Contractors (AGC)
         5.  Associated Builders and Contractors (ABC)
         6.  American Institute of Constructors (AIC)
         7.  Construction Management Association of America (CMAA)
         8.  Design-Build Institute of America (DBIA)
         9.  National Association of Home Builders (NAHB)
         10.  Retail Contractors Association (RCA)
         11.  The Mechanical Contractors Association of America (MCAA)
IV.  Construction Safety and Material Handling
    A.  Worker health and wellness      
         1.  Nutrition
         2.  Sleep
         3.  Ergonomics
    B.  CPR and first aid
    C.  Injuries and prevention
    D.  Occupational hazards
         1.  Falls
         2.  Being struck or crushed
         3.  Confined spaces
         4.  Electrocution
         5.  Fires
         6.  Explosions
         7.  Gases
         8.  Toxicity: lead, solvents, Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC), and skin, eye, and respiratory irritants
         9.  Sunlight
         10.  Heat and cold
         11.  Sound
         12.  Molds and other biological elements
    E.  Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)
         1.  Footwear
         2.  Hardhats
         3.  Vests
         4.  Harnesses
         5.  Gloves
         6.  Eye protection
         7.  Hearing protection
         8.  Environmental monitors
         9.  Respiratory protection
    F.  Injury and Illness Protective Program (IIPP)
    G.  Forklift and vehicle certifications
    H.  Aerial lifts
    I.  Heavy lifts
    J.  Scaffolding and ladders
    K.  Fall protection
    L.  Cranes
     M.  Hoists
    N.  Hazard communications: tag-out and lock-out
    O.  Material staging
    P.  Unemployment and disability
V.  Introduction to Basic Construction Hand and Power Tools
    A.  Hand tools
    B.  Power tools
         1.  Corded tools
         2.  Cordless tools
              a.  Gasoline-powered tools
              b.  Battery-powered tools
         3.  Pneumatic tools
         4.  Power-actuated fastener tools
    C.  Measuring tools
         1.  Levels and plumbs: string bob, bubble, and digital levels types
         2.  Tape measures: tape coil and laser types
         3.  The architect's scales
         4.  The carpenter's square
    D.  Survey tools
    E.  Ladders and scaffolding
    F.  Tool belts
    G.  Tool storage
    H.  Tool maintenance and care
    I.  Mobile technology: Tablets and smartphones
    J.  Pumps: air and water
    K.  Dust and dirt confinement systems
    L.  Field trips: tool supplier and tool rental yard
VI.  Construction Math and Measurement
    A.  Imperial and metric units of measurement and conversions
    B.  Basic trigonometry
     C.  Pythagorean theorem and geometry
    D.  How to read a tape and laser measurer for distance measurements
    E.  Unit measurement
    F.  Volume calculations
    G.  Length calculations
    H.  Area calculations
    I.  Construction materials waste calculations
    J.  Time budgeting
VII.  Employment Skills and Communication
    A. Work ethic
    B. Hard skills
    C. Soft skills
         1. Eye contact
         2. Handshakes
         3. Proper attire
         4. Professional and informal communications
              a. Phone skills
              b. Writing skills
              c. Response time
         5. Customer communications
         6. Coworker communications
              a. Daily reports
              b. Log books
         7. Social media and online presence
VIII.  Construction Industry Rules and Regulations Overview Discussion
IX.  Overview of the Building Process and a Project Lifecycle
    A.  Planning and design
    B.  Drawings and specifications
    C.  Building permit process
    D.  Competitive bidding process
    E.  Design-build process
    F.  Contracts
    G.  Construction process
    H.  Building inspections
    I.  Project observations by others
    J.  Change orders
    K.  Punch lists
    L.  Project close-out and Certificate of Occupancy
    M.  Warranty
    N.  Maintenance

Assignments:
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1.  Reading assignments (10-20 pages per week)
2.  Study question sets (1-3 weekly)
3.  Interview research report(s) (1-3)
4.  Quiz(zes) (1-4)
5.  Midterm exam
6.  Final exam

Methods of Evaluation/Basis of Grade.
Writing: Assessment tools that demonstrate writing skill and/or require students to select, organize and explain ideas in writing.Writing
5 - 10%
Interview research report(s)
Problem solving: Assessment tools, other than exams, that demonstrate competence in computational or non-computational problem solving skills.Problem Solving
30 - 60%
Study question sets
Skill Demonstrations: All skill-based and physical demonstrations used for assessment purposes including skill performance exams.Skill Demonstrations
0 - 0%
None
Exams: All forms of formal testing, other than skill performance exams.Exams
30 - 50%
Quiz(zes) and exams
Other: Includes any assessment tools that do not logically fit into the above categories.Other Category
5 - 10%
Class participation


Representative Textbooks and Materials:
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Construction Project Management. 6th edition. Sears, Keoki, Sears, Glenn, Clough, Richard, Rounds, Jerald, and Segne, Robert. Wiley. 2015 (classic)
Project Management in Construction. 5th edition. Levy, S. McGraw Hill. 2006 (classic)
Construction Project Management. 4th edition. Gould, F. and Joyce, N. Pearson. 2014 (classic)
Construction Project Management. 2nd edition. Dykstra, Alison. Kirschner Publishing. 2018
Instructor prepared materials

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