SRJC Course Outlines

11/27/2022 11:24:43 AMFIRE 204A Course Outline as of Summer 2014

Changed Course
CATALOG INFORMATION

Discipline and Nbr:  FIRE 204ATitle:  COMMAND 1A  
Full Title:  Command 1A
Last Reviewed:1/27/2014

UnitsCourse Hours per Week Nbr of WeeksCourse Hours Total
Maximum1.50Lecture Scheduled1.2517.5 max.Lecture Scheduled21.88
Minimum1.50Lab Scheduled1.002 min.Lab Scheduled17.50
 Contact DHR0 Contact DHR0
 Contact Total2.25 Contact Total39.38
 
 Non-contact DHR0 Non-contact DHR Total0

 Total Out of Class Hours:  43.75Total Student Learning Hours: 83.13 

Title 5 Category:  AA Degree Applicable
Grading:  P/NP Only
Repeatability:  00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP
Also Listed As: 
Formerly: 

Catalog Description:
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This course provides an introduction to the principles of command, an overview of the concepts of command safety, the risk management process, pre-incident planning considerations, command at structural fire incidents, initial actions at an incident including incident priorities, strategy and tactics and post incident actions.  Students will also participate in a variety of structural fire scenarios.  Upon successful completion, the student will be awarded a Command 1A certificate from the State Fire Marshal's office.

Prerequisites/Corequisites:
Course Completion of FIRE 201


Recommended Preparation:

Limits on Enrollment:
The State Fire Marshal's Office requires successful completion of I-200 class.

Schedule of Classes Information
Description: Untitled document
This course provides an introduction to the principles of command, an overview of the concepts of command safety, the risk management process, pre-incident planning considerations, command at structural fire incidents, initial actions at an incident including incident priorities, strategy and tactics and post incident actions.  Students will also participate in a variety of structural fire scenarios.  Upon successful completion, the student will be awarded a Command 1A certificate from the State Fire Marshal's office.
(P/NP Only)

Prerequisites:Course Completion of FIRE 201
Recommended:
Limits on Enrollment:The State Fire Marshal's Office requires successful completion of I-200 class.
Transfer Credit:
Repeatability:00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP

ARTICULATION, MAJOR, and CERTIFICATION INFORMATION

Associate Degree:Effective:Inactive:
 Area:
 
CSU GE:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 
IGETC:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 
CSU Transfer:Effective:Inactive:
 
UC Transfer:Effective:Inactive:
 
C-ID:

Certificate/Major Applicable: Certificate Applicable Course



COURSE CONTENT

Outcomes and Objectives:
Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:
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Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:
1.   Describe an Incident Management System (IMS).
2.   Describe the relationship of firefighter safety to strategy and tactics.
3.   Describe and use a variety of decision-making processes.
4.   Describe the concept of ethical behavior and the basic elements of command presence.
5.   Describe the elements of command and formulate initial fireground actions.
6.   Describe the types of building construction, fire dynamics and spread in a structure.
7.   Describe the benefits of built-in fire protection systems.
8.   Describe pre-incident structure fire considerations.
9.   Describe the local, state and federal resources available to assist with emergency incidents.
10. Describe the different functions of engine and truck companies and their effect on fire scenes.
11. Describe the guidelines for placing apparatus at structure fires.
12. Describe the quick field formula for determining fire flow.
13. Describe and demonstrate the size-up and report on conditions process.
14. Describe the process for initiating a plan of action at a structure fire.
15. Apply fireground concepts to a simulated structure fire.
16. Describe the strategic goals, tactical objectives and hazards associated with fires in one and two family  dwellings.
17. Describe the strategic goals, tactical objectives and hazards associated with fires in multi-family dwellings.
18. Describe the strategic goals, tactical objectives and hazards associated with fires in places in commercial buildings.
19. Describe the strategic goals, tactical objectives and hazards associated with fires in places of assembly.
20. Describe the post-incident actions and analysis of a structure fire.

Topics and Scope
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I. IMS Review
      a.  Origins and benefits of the IMS
      b.  Components and bases of the IMS
      c.  Roles and responsibilities of the IMS incident commander
II. Fireground Safety Concepts
      a.  The relationship of firefighter safety to tactics and strategy
      b.   Fireground injuries and deaths and scene safety concepts
      c.   Structure fire risk analysis
      d.   The risk management process
      e.   Risk refusal
       f.   Identification and management of life hazard zones
III.   Concepts of Decision Making
      a.   The Recognition -primed Decision Making model (RPD)
      b.   The Naturalist Decision Making model (NDM)
      c.   The Classic Decision Making model (CDM)
      d.   The decision-making process
IV.   Ethics And Command Presence On The Fireground
      a.   Ethical responsibilities of the leader
      b.   Command presence
V.    Principles Of Command
      a.   Factors for command considerations and scene coordination and control
      b.   Command communication systems
      c.   Scene size-up, goals and objectives
      d.   Command options and plan of action
      e.   Transfer of command process
VI.   Pre-incident Considerations
      a.   NFPA building construction types
      b.   Fire chemistry and the combustion process
      c.   Physics of fire
VII.  Support Of Built-In Fire Protection Systems
      a.   Benefits of buuilt-in fire protection systems
      b.   Differences between sprinkler, standpipe and special extinguishing systems
      c.   Types of sprinkler systems
      d.   Types of standpipe systems
      e.   Types of special extinguishing systems
       f.   Fire department support of built-in systems.
VIII.  Structure Fire Pre-Incident Considerations
      a.   The value benefits and importance of pre-incident planning
      b.   Data necessary to determine initial actions
      c.   Target hazard considerations
      d.   Pre-incident planning
      e.   Information in a pre-incident plan
       f.   Use of pre-incident plan standard operating guidelines (SOGs) in implementing an IMS
IX.    Local, State and Federal Mutual Aid Resources
      a.   Fire department resources
      b.   automatic and mutual aid
      c.   Other agencies that support the fire service
X.     Company Operations
      a.   Purpose and responsibility of engine company oprations
      b.   The three-step fire control process
      c.   Purpose and responsibility of truck company operations
      d.   Types of ventilation
      e.   Truck company support functions
       f.   Guidelines for intial attack
      g.   Considerations for specific occupancies
XI.    Apparatus Placement considerations
      a.   Factors that affect apparatus placement
      b.   Buidelines for placement of the first and second-in-engine and first-in-truck
      c.   The six fire faces
      d.   Apparatus placement hazards
      e.   Strategic goals and for apparatus placement
XII.   Fire Flow Requirements
      a.   The quick field fire flow formula
      b.   The National Fire Academy fire flow formula
      c.   Resources and process to calculate fire flow
XIII.  Command Considerations
      a.   Size-up and the command sequence
      b.   Information sources and concerns associated with size-up
      c.   Ongoing size-up and tracking information
      d.   Developing action plans based on size-up information
      e.   The size-up triangle and factor that affect size-up
       f.   Acronyms, abbreviations and mnemonics used with size-up
      g.   Componenets of and radio procedures used to deliver a report on conditions
XIV.  Implementing Initial Incident Actions
      a.   Determining resource requirements
      b.   Developing and implementing a plan of action and associated documentation
      c.   Evaluating the on-going incident
      d.   Transfer of command
XV.   Fire Scene Scenarios
      a.  The four types of structures used in scenarios
      b.   Procedures and criteria used in structure fire scenarios
XVI.  Tactical Considerations in One and Two Family Dwellings
      a.   Life safety risks and construction considerations
      b.   Hazards encountered including basements, upper floors, attics, attached garages and manufactures homes
      c.   Strategic goals and tactical considerations
XVII. Tactical Considerations in Multi-family Dwellings
      a.   Life safety risks and construction considerations
      b.   Hazards encountered including garden apartments, brownstones, row apartments and older units
      c.   Strategic goals and tactical considerations
XVIII. Tactical Considerations in Commercial Buildings
      a.   Life safety risks and construction considerations
      b.   Hazards encountered including strip malls, large, two and three-story and stand-alone commercial buildings
      c.   Strategic goals and tactical considerations
XIX.   Tactical Considerations in Places of Assembly
      a.   Life safety risks and construction considerations
      b.   Hazards encountered including churches, exhibition halls, sports arenas and nightclubs
      c.   Strategic goals and tactical considerations
XX.    Post Incident Actions
      a.   Incident termination and demobilization
      b.   Purpose and types of Post Incident Analysis (PIA)
      c.   Performing a successful PIA
      d.   Types of Critical Incident Stress Management (CSIM)
      e.   Effects of critical incidents on firefighting personnel

Assignments:
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1.  3-7 command and decision based scenarios
2.  3-7 activity worksheets
3.  Summative exam
4.  Must meet all attendance and participation guidelines.  May not miss more than two hours.

Methods of Evaluation/Basis of Grade.
Writing: Assessment tools that demonstrate writing skill and/or require students to select, organize and explain ideas in writing.Writing
5 - 15%
Completion of activity worksheets, development of an initial plan of action and PIA
Problem solving: Assessment tools, other than exams, that demonstrate competence in computational or non-computational problem solving skills.Problem Solving
5 - 15%
Command and decision based scenarios
Skill Demonstrations: All skill-based and physical demonstrations used for assessment purposes including skill performance exams.Skill Demonstrations
5 - 10%
Command and decision based scenarios
Exams: All forms of formal testing, other than skill performance exams.Exams
60 - 80%
Summative Exam
Other: Includes any assessment tools that do not logically fit into the above categories.Other Category
5 - 10%
Must meet all attendance and participation guidelines


Representative Textbooks and Materials:
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Command 1A: Command Operations for the Company Officer, California 1st edition, 2012, Delmar
CFSTES Command 1A Student Manual, California Fire Service Training and Education System, Sacramento, CA 2012

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