SRJC Course Outlines

4/21/2024 8:17:13 PMTHAR 19 Course Outline as of Fall 2013

Changed Course
CATALOG INFORMATION

Discipline and Nbr:  THAR 19Title:  MOVEMENT & IMPROV  
Full Title:  Movement and Improvisation
Last Reviewed:5/14/2018

UnitsCourse Hours per Week Nbr of WeeksCourse Hours Total
Maximum2.00Lecture Scheduled2.0017.5 max.Lecture Scheduled35.00
Minimum2.00Lab Scheduled1.006 min.Lab Scheduled17.50
 Contact DHR0 Contact DHR0
 Contact Total3.00 Contact Total52.50
 
 Non-contact DHR0 Non-contact DHR Total0

 Total Out of Class Hours:  70.00Total Student Learning Hours: 122.50 

Title 5 Category:  AA Degree Applicable
Grading:  Grade Only
Repeatability:  00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP
Also Listed As: 
Formerly:  THAR 9

Catalog Description:
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Fundamental study of movement and improvisation for the student performer. Emphasis is placed on developing within the actor an understanding of his/her body as an instrument of expression and communication.Course encompasses exercises and explorations based on a variety of techniques for developing body and spatial awareness,including an introduction to mime, the use of Neutral Mask and character masks, and ensemble development exercises.

Prerequisites/Corequisites:


Recommended Preparation:

Limits on Enrollment:

Schedule of Classes Information
Description: Untitled document
Fundamental study of movement and improvisation for the student performer. Emphasis is placed on developing within the actor an understanding of his/her body as an instrument of expression and communication.Course encompasses exercises and explorations based on a variety of techniques for developing body and spatial awareness,including an introduction to mime, the use of Neutral Mask and character masks, and ensemble development exercises.
(Grade Only)

Prerequisites:
Recommended:
Limits on Enrollment:
Transfer Credit:CSU;UC.
Repeatability:00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP

ARTICULATION, MAJOR, and CERTIFICATION INFORMATION

Associate Degree:Effective:Inactive:
 Area:
 
CSU GE:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 
IGETC:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 
CSU Transfer:TransferableEffective:Spring 1987Inactive:
 
UC Transfer:TransferableEffective:Spring 1987Inactive:
 
C-ID:

Certificate/Major Applicable: Certificate Applicable Course



COURSE CONTENT

Outcomes and Objectives:
At the conclusion of this course, the student should be able to:
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In order to achieve these learning outcomes, during the course the student will:
1.    Learn systems of classification of movement dynamics pertaining to characterization.
2.    Develop flexibility and originality in movement.
3.    Analyze the importance of changes in tempo, mood and character through movement
       and improvisation.
4.    Put into action the techniques of movement and improvisation through rehearsal of
        original routines for class performances.
5.    Compare and contrast the effects of personal intervention, invention, cleverness, and
       heart in a performance.
6.    Analyze and put into action the concept of "hollow flexibility."
7.    Safely and respectfully use physical contact with another's body, controlling the
        transfer of weight to achieve dramatic effect onstage.
8.    Employ a variety of physical characterization techniques specific to mask work.
9.    Create classic mimetic illusions such as the wall, leans, rope manipulation, climbing,
        levitating, making an object appear active or frozen independently of the actor, and
        manipulate and interact with imaginary objects or persons.
10.  Embody classic clown types with characteristic lazzi, solo or ensemble.
11.  Physically analyze and reproduce in their own body observed character movement
       and the movement of animals and machines.

Topics and Scope
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I.    Body mechanics and conditioning for the actor
      A.  Body alignment and balance
       B.  Exercises to strengthen and stretch the limbs
      C.   Focus and Concentration
      D.  Working with the breath
      E.  Warming up the voice
II.   Appropriate use and care of the body
      A. Stress Reduction
      B. Relaxation
      C. Safety
III.  Introduction to theories of movement and movement terminology
       using two or more of the following techniques:
      A.  Delsarte
      B.  Decroux
      C.  Laban  
       D.  Viewpoints
IV.   Movement-based character studies        
       A.  Application of imagery as a tool to evoke character-appropriate  
            movement
      B.  Drawing on sources of movement such as:
           1.  Observation of human movement in our world
           2.  Dreams and fantasy
           3.  Myth and legend
      C.  Movement with props and costumes
V.    Use of mask:
      A. The neutral mask
      B. The character mask
VI.   Introduction to movement improvisation
      A.  Individual, duo, and group explorations
      B.  Creative problem-solving through body movement
VII.  Working with other actors including topics such as:
      A.  Trust exercises
      B.  Introduction to basic partnering techniques
           1.  Giving and taking of body weight
           2.  Following the "script" of spontaneous contact onstage
VIII. Correct and safe body mechanics in the execution of common falls
         used in the theatre
IX.   Incorporation of vocal sounds and words to punctuate movement and
          improvisation
X.    Fundamentals of mime
       A.  Brief history
       B.  Pantomime vs. mime
       C.  Creation of imaginary of objects and situations
       D.  Portraying a narrative, character, mood, and/or idea through body

Assignments:
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1.  Class Attendance and Participation - The student is expected to:
    A.  Arrive promptly and prepared for all class meetings.
    B.  Participate in body conditioning exercises, relaxation, centering and mind-body
         awareness exercises.
    C.  Participate in solo, duo, and group movement activities, applying techniques and
         and concepts studied.
    D.  Participate in class discussions on personal understanding of concepts
         introduced in class and applications of the principles of physical theater.
 
2.  Perform four to eight solo movement studies applying principles covered throughout
      the semester.  Examples of such studies include:
 
     A.  Snow White's Heart  
            Preparation:  Carefully observe the movement style of an actual person other
            than yourself.
           Skill Demonstration: In class, perform a movement study demonstrating the
            movement style of the observed person, jettisoning all your own habits of
            movements so thoroughly, while taking on those of the person you observed,
            that at least two classmates shake their heads and wonder if that could really
             be you standing before them.
 
     B.  Snow White's Crankcase
           Preparation:  Carefully observe the movement of a specific machine.
           Skill Demonstration: In class, perform a movement study demonstrating that
           of the observed machine, jettisoning all your own habits of movements so
           thoroughly, while taking on those of your model, that at least two classmates
           shake their heads and wonder if that could really be a human being standing
           before them.
 
      C.  Love Me, Love My Dog
            Preparation:  Carefully observe a person and his/her pet.
            Skill Demonstration:  In class, perform a movement study in which you have absorbed each subject so thoroughly that you can show them to the class in sequence or both at once, relating to each other and turning into each other.
 
      D.  In an improvised movement piece, travel to a location (e.g. Tibetan Himalayas,
            Nile Delta, Antartica, the Moon) without leaving a three-foot circle drawn on the
            stage.
 
       E.  Mime Movement Study
            Ups and Downs: Mimetically create the illusion of an elevator, escalator, or
            staircase while walking past a waist-high restaurant or office window. Note
            "audience" reactions and be prepared to discuss the experience in class.
 
3.  Create and perform an improvised story, either in solo or in an ensemble class
     performance, while observing the narrative guidelines:
        A.  Allow the story to grow organically without personal intervention,
              invention, or cleverness.
       B. Put into action the concept of "hollow flexibility" to intuitively feel what wants to
             come next and allow that to appear through movement and improvisation.
       C.  Reincorporate motifs, names, characters, and situations.
 
4.  Script and perform a collaborative story or sketch:
       A.  Develop the text through collaborative thought and physical improvisation.
       B.  Put into action the concept of "hollow flexibility" to intuitively feel what wants
             to come next.
       C.  Allow that to appear in thematic material, in plot, and in development of
            characters.
 
5.  Constructively analyze and critique the work of fellow actors in class discussion
     and/or written critique assignments.

Methods of Evaluation/Basis of Grade.
Writing: Assessment tools that demonstrate writing skill and/or require students to select, organize and explain ideas in writing.Writing
10 - 15%
Devised script(s); written critiques
Problem solving: Assessment tools, other than exams, that demonstrate competence in computational or non-computational problem solving skills.Problem Solving
0 - 0%
None
Skill Demonstrations: All skill-based and physical demonstrations used for assessment purposes including skill performance exams.Skill Demonstrations
50 - 75%
Improvisations; movement studies; routines for public performances
Exams: All forms of formal testing, other than skill performance exams.Exams
0 - 0%
None
Other: Includes any assessment tools that do not logically fit into the above categories.Other Category
15 - 35%
Attendance and participation


Representative Textbooks and Materials:
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Instructor prepared materials
 
Improvisation for the Theater.  Spolin, Viola.  Northwestern University Press: 1999 (classic)
 
Every Little Movement.  Shawn, Ted.  Princeton Book Co Pub:  1976 (classic)
 
Lazzi.  Gordon, Mel.  PAJ Books:  2001(classic)
 
Clown Scenes.  Remy, Tristan.  Ivan R Dee:  1997 (classic)

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