SRJC Course Outlines

12/5/2020 12:58:55 AMMEDIA 22 Course Outline as of Fall 2012

New Course (First Version)
CATALOG INFORMATION

Discipline and Nbr:  MEDIA 22Title:  SCREENWRITING  
Full Title:  Screenwriting
Last Reviewed:2/12/2018

UnitsCourse Hours per Week Nbr of WeeksCourse Hours Total
Maximum3.00Lecture Scheduled3.0017.5 max.Lecture Scheduled52.50
Minimum3.00Lab Scheduled06 min.Lab Scheduled0
 Contact DHR0 Contact DHR0
 Contact Total3.00 Contact Total52.50
 
 Non-contact DHR0 Non-contact DHR Total0

 Total Out of Class Hours:  105.00Total Student Learning Hours: 157.50 

Title 5 Category:  AA Degree Applicable
Grading:  Grade or P/NP
Repeatability:  00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP
Also Listed As: 
Formerly: 

Catalog Description:
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An introduction to the fundamentals of screenwriting, including story structure, character development, dialogue, plotting, and formatting as they are used in creating scripts for film and television.

Prerequisites/Corequisites:
Completion of ENGL 100B or higher (V8) OR Qualifying Test Score of 125 in ENGL


Recommended Preparation:
Completion of MEDIA 10

Limits on Enrollment:

Schedule of Classes Information
Description: Untitled document
An introduction to the fundamentals of screenwriting, including story structure, character development, dialogue, plotting, and formatting as they are used in creating scripts for film and television.
(Grade or P/NP)

Prerequisites:Completion of ENGL 100B or higher (V8) OR Qualifying Test Score of 125 in ENGL
Recommended:Completion of MEDIA 10
Limits on Enrollment:
Transfer Credit:CSU;UC.
Repeatability:00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP

ARTICULATION, MAJOR, and CERTIFICATION INFORMATION

Associate Degree:Effective:Inactive:
 Area:
 
CSU GE:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 
IGETC:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 
CSU Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 2012Inactive:
 
UC Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 2012Inactive:
 
C-ID:

Certificate/Major Applicable: Not Certificate/Major Applicable



COURSE CONTENT

Outcomes and Objectives:
Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:
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Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:
 
1.   Demonstrate knowledge of screenplay format.
2.   Describe screenwriting business practices in the film industry.
3.   Analyze a screenplay from an industry reader's perspective.
4.   Analyze and demonstrate the use of the "three act" structure.
5.   Analyze and demonstrate the use of various character elements including:
      (a) character arc;
      (b) use of foils, protagonists, & antagonists; and
      (c) revelation of character qualities through dramatic action.  
6.   Create dialogue and subtext that demonstrates verisimilitude.
7.   Compose at least one act (or at least 30 pages) of polished screenwriting.

Topics and Scope
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I.   Structuring and Plotting
    A.  Three-Act structure
    B.  Character arcs
    C.  The Hero's Journey and other popular structural models
    D.  Treatments
II.  Formatting
    A.  Master scenes
    B.  Software and page set-up features
    C.  Transitions, camera angles, sound effects, and special effects
    D.  Produced scripts vs. speculative scripts
III.  Writing
    A.  Treatments
    B.  Character histories
    C.  Sequences, scenes, and beats
    D.  Action
    E.  Dialogue and subtext
    F.  Studio coverage on a produced script
IV.  Revising
    A.  Workshops
    B.  Peer critiques
V.   Film Analysis
    A.  Film grammar
    B.  Film genres
VI.  Marketing
    A.  Pitching
    B.  Marketing the speculative "spec" script

Assignments:
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1.  Readings: (40 to 50 pages per week)
     a. Reading and analysis of representative screenplays
     b. Style handbook for proper writing formats
     c. Periodical literature pertinent to screenwriting topics and
        to the film and television industry which applies to the
        writer and the writing process
2.  Screenings and discussions of representative feature films
3.  Writing: (90 to 120 pages)
     a. Weekly creative assignments dealing with various topics such
        as format, dialogue, characterization
     b. A major screenplay project
4.   Participation in group activities, in-class workshops, peer critiques, optional quizzes, and exams

Methods of Evaluation/Basis of Grade.
Writing: Assessment tools that demonstrate writing skill and/or require students to select, organize and explain ideas in writing.Writing
70 - 80%
Written homework, script development, screenplay
Problem solving: Assessment tools, other than exams, that demonstrate competence in computational or non-computational problem solving skills.Problem Solving
0 - 0%
None
Skill Demonstrations: All skill-based and physical demonstrations used for assessment purposes including skill performance exams.Skill Demonstrations
0 - 0%
None
Exams: All forms of formal testing, other than skill performance exams.Exams
0 - 20%
Quizzes, Exams
Other: Includes any assessment tools that do not logically fit into the above categories.Other Category
0 - 20%
Class Participation and Group Work


Representative Textbooks and Materials:
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Making a Good Script Great, 3rd ed.  Seger, L.   Silman-James Press:  2010
Screenplay: The Foundations of Screenwriting.  Field, S.  Delta Press:  2005
The Screenwriter's Bible: A Complete Guide to Writing, Formatting, and Selling Your Script, 5th ed.  Trottier, D.  Silman-James Press:  2010
Writing the Screenplay, 2nd ed.  Armer, A. A.  Waveland:  2002 (Classic)

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