SRJC Course Outlines

7/5/2022 9:06:48 PMART 13 Course Outline as of Spring 2011

Changed Course
CATALOG INFORMATION

Discipline and Nbr:  ART 13Title:  WATERCOLOR  
Full Title:  Watercolor
Last Reviewed:2/13/2017

UnitsCourse Hours per Week Nbr of WeeksCourse Hours Total
Maximum3.00Lecture Scheduled2.0017.5 max.Lecture Scheduled35.00
Minimum1.50Lab Scheduled4.006 min.Lab Scheduled70.00
 Contact DHR0 Contact DHR0
 Contact Total6.00 Contact Total105.00
 
 Non-contact DHR0 Non-contact DHR Total0

 Total Out of Class Hours:  70.00Total Student Learning Hours: 175.00 

Title 5 Category:  AA Degree Applicable
Grading:  Grade or P/NP
Repeatability:  00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP
Also Listed As: 
Formerly: 

Catalog Description:
Untitled document
A painting course using watercolor to explore light, color, form, and composition. Students will work from still life, landscape, the human figure, and non-objective subject matter.

Prerequisites/Corequisites:


Recommended Preparation:
Course Completion of ART 3 or ART 4 or ART 7A

Limits on Enrollment:

Schedule of Classes Information
Description: Untitled document
A painting course using watercolor to explore light, color, form, and composition. Students will work from still life, landscape, the human figure, and non-objective subject matter.
(Grade or P/NP)

Prerequisites:
Recommended:Course Completion of ART 3 or ART 4 or ART 7A
Limits on Enrollment:
Transfer Credit:CSU;UC.
Repeatability:00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP

ARTICULATION, MAJOR, and CERTIFICATION INFORMATION

Associate Degree:Effective:Inactive:
 Area:
 
CSU GE:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 
IGETC:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 
CSU Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 1981Inactive:
 
UC Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 1981Inactive:
 
C-ID:

Certificate/Major Applicable: Certificate Applicable Course



COURSE CONTENT

Outcomes and Objectives:
Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:
Untitled document
1. Examine and resolve complex problems of shape, scale, value, color, and line.
2. Demonstrate the proper use of the tools of watercolor painting.
3. Employ and interpret the basics of color dynamics and color mixing using transparent washes.
4. Relate pictorial problems to examples of watercolor painting of the past and present from both European and non-European traditions.
5. Critique one's own painting and the paintings of others.

Topics and Scope
Untitled document
I. Basic pictorial considerations
    A. Composition
    B. Positive and negative shapes
    C. Orchestration of darks and lights
    D. Texture and edge characteristics
II. Watercolor methods and materials
    A. Paper stock: texture and absorbency
    B. Wetting, stretching, and taping supporting paper
    C. Use of and care for watercolor, sumi, and hake brushes
    D. Use of sponges, masking, and working around whites
     E.  Flat washes
    F.  Graduated washes
    G.  Wet into wet
III. Color dynamics
    A. Contrasts of values, of complements, saturation, and temperature
    B. Toning colors with its complements
    C. Triadic harmonies
    D. Expressive aspects of color
IV. Precedents in watercolor painting
    A. English watercolorists
     B. German Expressionist painters
    C. Masters of watercolor
    D. Asian brush painting
    E. Contemporary approaches to watercolor painting
V. Critique critical judgment
    A. Appraisal, technical and formal analysis of masterworks
    B. Appraisal, technical and formal analysis of student works

Assignments:
Untitled document
Assignments may include:
1. Mapping values in pencil prior to painting in order to analyze the overall pattern of light and dark shape areas.
2. Still life study of composition and value (monochromatic).
3. Still life study using directional light source to describe light and cast shadows.
4. Still life and landscape compositions to investigate color relationships: primary, secondary, complementary, and triadic.
5. Master copy watercolor paintings.
6. Abstracting forms in nature through gesture and mark-making.
7. Brush painting based on Asian masters.
 
Homework Problems:
1.Series of exercises using transparent washes to explore effects of light, shadow, and color.
2. Color wheel in twelve steps.
3. Series of exercises varying the ratio of water to pigment.
4. Series of exercises in various watercolor painting techniques:  flat wash, layered washes, wet-into-wet painting, individual touches.
5. Interpreting photographic images in watercolor.
6. Landscape studies away from campus: coastal, rural, suburban, and urban.

Methods of Evaluation/Basis of Grade.
Writing: Assessment tools that demonstrate writing skill and/or require students to select, organize and explain ideas in writing.Writing
0 - 0%
None
This is a degree applicable course but assessment tools based on writing are not included because problem solving assessments and skill demonstrations are more appropriate for this course.
Problem solving: Assessment tools, other than exams, that demonstrate competence in computational or non-computational problem solving skills.Problem Solving
25 - 40%
Homework problems
Skill Demonstrations: All skill-based and physical demonstrations used for assessment purposes including skill performance exams.Skill Demonstrations
45 - 60%
Class performances, paintings, and sketchbooks
Exams: All forms of formal testing, other than skill performance exams.Exams
0 - 0%
None
Other: Includes any assessment tools that do not logically fit into the above categories.Other Category
10 - 15%
Other factors: attendance, effort, growth, participation


Representative Textbooks and Materials:
Untitled document
The Art of Watercolor.  LeClair, Charles.  Watson-Guptill Publications:  1999.  (Classic)
 
Basic Watercolor Techniques.  Albert, Greg.  North Light Books:  1991. (Classic)
 
Mustard Seed Garden Manual of Painting.  Sze, Mai-mai.  Bollingen Foundation:  1978.  (Classic)

Print PDF