SRJC Course Outlines

10/22/2020 2:52:27 AMMUSC 7 Course Outline as of Fall 2009

Changed Course
CATALOG INFORMATION

Discipline and Nbr:  MUSC 7Title:  CLASSICAL MUSIC APPREC  
Full Title:  Classical Music Appreciation
Last Reviewed:10/12/2020

UnitsCourse Hours per Week Nbr of WeeksCourse Hours Total
Maximum3.00Lecture Scheduled3.0017.5 max.Lecture Scheduled52.50
Minimum3.00Lab Scheduled06 min.Lab Scheduled0
 Contact DHR0 Contact DHR0
 Contact Total3.00 Contact Total52.50
 
 Non-contact DHR0 Non-contact DHR Total0

 Total Out of Class Hours:  105.00Total Student Learning Hours: 157.50 

Title 5 Category:  AA Degree Applicable
Grading:  Grade Only
Repeatability:  00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP
Also Listed As: 
Formerly:  MUS 7

Catalog Description:
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A survey of music literature in the Western world from the Middle Ages to the present. Students will gain an understanding of music as an art form through listening and discussion of choral, orchestral, solo, opera, chamber, and electronic works. Concert attendance is required. Open to all students, but designed for the non-music major.  

Prerequisites/Corequisites:


Recommended Preparation:
Eligibility for ENGL 1A or equivalent

Limits on Enrollment:

Schedule of Classes Information
Description: Untitled document
A survey of music literature in the Western world from the Middle Ages to the present. Students will gain an understanding of music as an art form through listening and discussion of choral, orchestral, solo, opera, chamber, and electronic works. Concert attendance is required. Open to all students, but designed for the non-music major.  
(Grade Only)

Prerequisites:
Recommended:Eligibility for ENGL 1A or equivalent
Limits on Enrollment:
Transfer Credit:CSU;UC.
Repeatability:00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP

ARTICULATION, MAJOR, and CERTIFICATION INFORMATION

Associate Degree:Effective:Fall 2007
Inactive: 
 Area:E
Humanities
 
CSU GE:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 C1ArtsFall 2007
 
IGETC:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 3AArtsFall 2007
 
CSU Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 2007Inactive:
 
UC Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 2007Inactive:
 
C-ID:
 CID Descriptor: MUS 100 Music Appreciation SRJC Equivalent Course(s): MUSC7

Certificate/Major Applicable: Major Applicable Course



COURSE CONTENT

Outcomes and Objectives:
Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:
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Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:
1.  Define and explain the basic elements of music: melody, harmony,
   rhythm, musical form, texture, etc.
2.  Define and explain the sound properties of various musical instruments
   and ensembles.
3.  Compare and contrast the differences in artistic style and culture of
   the Medieval, Renaissance, Baroque, Classical, Romantic, and Modern
   eras in relation to politics, religion, and economics.
4.  Identify the prominent composers of each stylistic period and
   explain their historical importance.
5.  Identify musical compositions from the various historical eras by
   listening.
6.  Explain how musical styles and techniques relate to both the
   biographical details of the composers and their compositions.
7.  Explain how the dynamic interactions of Western and non-Western
   musical traditions have transformed the development of Western music.  

Topics and Scope
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I.    The Elements of Music
     A.  Melody: phrase, cadence, and range
     B.  Rhythm: meter, measures, metrical patterns and syncopation
     C.  Harmony: chords, cadences, consonance and dissonance
     D.  Texture:  monophonic, homophonic, polyphonic, and homorhythmic
     E.  Expression: tempo and dynamics
II.   Musical Instruments and Ensembles
     A.  Musical timbre and the voice
     B.  The sound properties of string, woodwind, brass, percussion,
         and electronic instruments
     C.  Musical ensembles: choral groups, chamber, orchestral, and
         bands
     D.  Style and the function of music in society
(For each historical era, discussion will focus on the social and
economic conditions of that era, political and religious movements,
interactions of Western and non-Western cultures and musical traditions,
and how all of these factors shaped the works of the prominent composers
of that era.)
III.  The Medieval and Renaissance Eras (c. 1000 - 1600)
     A.  Sacred and secular music of the Middle Ages
     B.  Sacred and secular music of the Renaissance
     C.  Major composers (von Bingen, Machaut, Josquin, Palestrina, et al
IV.   The Baroque Era (1600 - 1750)
     A.  The development of the major/minor system
     B.  Vocal music in the Baroque era - the development of Opera
     C.  Instrumental music in the Baroque era
     D.  Major composers (Handel, J. S. Bach, et al.)
V.    The Classical Era (1750 - 1825)
     A.  The "Age of Enlightenment"
     B.  Artists and the patronage system
     C.  Chamber music
     D.  The classical symphony, concerto, and sonata
     E.  Choral music and opera
     F.  Major composers (Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, et al.)
VI.   The Romantic Era (1825 - 1900)
     A.  Art song (Schubert, R. Schumann, et al.)
     B.  The 19th Century piano piece (Chopin, Liszt, C.Schumann, et al.)
     C.  Romantic program music, symphony, and concerto (Berlioz, Brahms,
         et al.)
     D.  The rise of nationalism in the arts (Smetana, Dvorak, et al.)
     E.  Choral and dramatic music in the 19th Century (Verdi, Wagner, et
         al.)
VII.  The Modern Era (1900 - present)
     A.  The Post-Romantic Era (Mahler, et al.)
     B.  Impressionism and Post-Impressionism (Debussy, Ravel, et al.)
     C.  Expressionism and Neoclassicism
     D.  New elements of musical style:
         1.  Atonality and serialism (Schoenberg, Berg, Webern, et al.)
         2.  Expanded tonality (Stravinsky, Bartok, et al.)
         3.  Aleatory (John Cage, et al.)
         4.  Electronic Music (Stockhausen, Varese, et al.)
     E.  Ragtime, blues, and jazz (Joplin, Still, Ellington, et al.)
     F.  Rock and the global scene
     G.  The New Romanticism (Barber, del Tredici, Tower, et al.)
     H.  Minimalism and Post-Minimalism (Glass, Riley, Part, Adams, et
         al.)  

Assignments:
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1.  Reading from the text (20-30 pp. per week)
2.  Assigned listening (1-2 hrs. per week)
3.  Written and aural examinations after each period of study
4.  1-2 concert attendance reports (2-3 pp.)
5.  1-2 written reports on a composer or other topic studied. (2-3 pp.)
6.  Comprehensive (aural and written) final examination
7.  Attendance and participation in class discussions  

Methods of Evaluation/Basis of Grade.
Writing: Assessment tools that demonstrate writing skill and/or require students to select, organize and explain ideas in writing.Writing
10 - 20%
Reading reports, Concert reports.
Problem solving: Assessment tools, other than exams, that demonstrate competence in computational or non-computational problem solving skills.Problem Solving
0 - 0%
None
Skill Demonstrations: All skill-based and physical demonstrations used for assessment purposes including skill performance exams.Skill Demonstrations
0 - 0%
None
Exams: All forms of formal testing, other than skill performance exams.Exams
75 - 85%
Multiple choice, Completion, Listening quizzes
Other: Includes any assessment tools that do not logically fit into the above categories.Other Category
5 - 10%
Attendance and participation


Representative Textbooks and Materials:
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Machlis, Joseph and Kristine Forney. The Enjoyment of Music, Shorter
Edition. 9th Edition. New York: W. W. Norton, 2003.
Kamien, Roger. Music: An Appreciation (Brief Edition). McGraw Hill, 2005.  

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