SRJC Course Outlines

7/12/2024 7:20:58 AMASTRON 3 Course Outline as of Fall 2009

Changed Course
CATALOG INFORMATION

Discipline and Nbr:  ASTRON 3Title:  STELLAR ASTRONOMY  
Full Title:  Stellar Astronomy
Last Reviewed:1/25/2021

UnitsCourse Hours per Week Nbr of WeeksCourse Hours Total
Maximum3.00Lecture Scheduled3.0017.5 max.Lecture Scheduled52.50
Minimum3.00Lab Scheduled06 min.Lab Scheduled0
 Contact DHR0 Contact DHR0
 Contact Total3.00 Contact Total52.50
 
 Non-contact DHR0 Non-contact DHR Total0

 Total Out of Class Hours:  105.00Total Student Learning Hours: 157.50 

Title 5 Category:  AA Degree Applicable
Grading:  Grade or P/NP
Repeatability:  00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP
Also Listed As: 
Formerly: 

Catalog Description:
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A description of the universe, concentrating on celestial bodies and phenomena beyond the Solar System. Topics will include electromagnetic radiation, observed properties of stars, variable and binary stars, extra-solar planets, stellar evolution, black holes, relativity, the interstellar medium, star clusters, the Milky Way and other galaxies, cosmology, and the possibility of other life forms in the universe.

Prerequisites/Corequisites:


Recommended Preparation:
Completion or Concurrent Enrollment in Math 150A AND English 100 or ESL 100.

Limits on Enrollment:

Schedule of Classes Information
Description: Untitled document
A description of the universe, concentrating on celestial bodies and phenomena beyond the Solar System. Topics will include electromagnetic radiation, observed properties of stars, variable and binary stars, extra-solar planets, stellar evolution, black holes, relativity, the interstellar medium, star clusters, the Milky Way and other galaxies, cosmology, and the possibility of other life forms in the universe.
(Grade or P/NP)

Prerequisites:
Recommended:Completion or Concurrent Enrollment in Math 150A AND English 100 or ESL 100.
Limits on Enrollment:
Transfer Credit:CSU;UC.
Repeatability:00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP

ARTICULATION, MAJOR, and CERTIFICATION INFORMATION

Associate Degree:Effective:Fall 1981
Inactive: 
 Area:C
Natural Sciences
 
CSU GE:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 B1Physical ScienceFall 1981
 
IGETC:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 5APhysical SciencesFall 1981
 
CSU Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 1981Inactive:
 
UC Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 1981Inactive:
 
C-ID:

Certificate/Major Applicable: Major Applicable Course



COURSE CONTENT

Outcomes and Objectives:
At the conclusion of this course, the student should be able to:
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Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:
1. Define and apply the scientific method.
2. List the regions of the electromagnetic spectrum, discussing how each varies in
      terms of wavelength, frequency, and energy.  
 3. Define and cite examples of the properties of waves: reflection, refraction, and
     diffraction.
4. Describe how continuous, emission, and absorption spectra are created.
 5. Discuss the methods of determining the distances to stars and calculate the distance to a star
      if its parallax is given.
6. Summarize how the mass of a star is derived and list the stellar properties which
     can be determined if its mass is calculated.
 7. Construct a Hertzsprung-Russell Diagram and discuss what each region represents in   
      the stellar evolutionary cycle.
 8.  Summarize the processes which occur as stars of various mass evolve from birth to
      death, including their possible core phases: white dwarfs, neutron stars, and black  
      holes.
9.  Explain Einstein's theories of Special and General Relativity.
10. Identify and describe the components of the Interstellar Medium.
11. Label the parts and discuss the structure of the Milky Way Galaxy.
12. Identify and describe the characteristics of the Hubble Types of galaxies.
13. Discuss active galaxies, gravitational lensing, and the possible phenomena which
      create gamma ray bursts.
14. Summarize the cosmological models which have been proposed from the time of
       Edwin Hubble to the present.

Topics and Scope
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I.  Overview of the universe
      A. Science and the scientific method
      B. Celestial bodies in the universe
      C. Distance units and scales
II. Electromagnetic radiation (EMR)
      A. Electromagnetic spectrum
      B. Wave model of EMR
          1. Wavelength
          2. Frequency
      C. Quantum model of EMR
          1. Photons
          2. Energy
      D. Properties of EMR and waves
      E. Radiation Laws
      F. Spectra
          1. Continuous spectrum
          2. Emission spectrum
          3. Absorption spectrum
III. Stellar distances
      A. Units of angular measure
      B. Method of triangulation
      C. Distance modulus
IV. Stellar brightnesses
      A. Photometry
      B. Apparent magnitude
      C. Absolute magnitude
V.  Variable stars
      A. Period-luminosity relation for cepheid variable stars
      B. Discovery of other galaxies using the period-luminosity
          relation
VI. Stellar masses
      A. Determination of the mass of a star by observing binary   
          star systems
      B. Stars with varying masses and their distribution
      C. Discovery of extrasolar planets
VII. Stellar evolution
      A. Stellar spectral sequence
      B. Hertzsprung-Russell Diagram
           1. Nebulae
           2. Main sequence stars
           3. Giant (Red Giant) stars
           4. Supergiant stars
           5. White dwarf stars
      C. Life cycle of a 1 solar mass star
      D. Life cycle of a high mass star
      E. Deaths of stars and mass loss
           1. Planetary nebulae
           2. Supernovae
                 a) Type I supernovae
                 b) Type II supernovae
VIII. The core phase of stellar evolution
      A. White dwarfs
      B. Neutron stars (pulsars)
      C. Black holes
IX.  Albert Einstein's Theories of Relativity
      A. General relativity
      B. Special relativity
      C. Twin paradox and time dilation
X.   The interstellar medium
      A. Dust
      B. Gas
          1. HI Regions
          2. HII Regions
XI.  Star Clusters
      A. Open clusters
      B. Globular clusters
XII. The Milky Way Galaxy
XIII.Other galaxies
      A. Hubble Types of galaxies
      B. Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN'S)
      C. Clusters of galaxies
      D. Gravitational lensing
XIV. Cosmology
      A. Edwin Hubble and his discovery of universal expansion
          1. The Hubble Law
          2. The Hubble Constant
      B. Evidence for the Big Bang and other theories
      C. Possible geometries of space-time
      D. String theory
      E. Dark matter and dark energy
XV.  Life in the universe
      A. Claims versus actual evidence that extraterrestrials have
         visited Earth
      B. Using the Drake Equation to estimate the number of
          civilizations in the Milky Way Galaxy and the universe

Assignments:
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1. Reading from the textbook or instructor prepared materials (averaging one chapter per
    week, roughly 20-30 pages).
2. Homework assignments, 5-11 per semester, which may include independent research, group              projects, problem sets, written work, visits to Santa Rosa Junior College Planetarium,
    and/or reaction papers to selected scientific movies or articles. Reaction papers should   
    be 1 to 1.5 pages long and typed.   One 1000-2500 word typed research papers (using at least two     outside sources) on instructor approved subjects may also be assigned.
3. In-class exercises/activities, 5-15 per semester, on subject matter presented that day in class
    and/or pertaining to videos watched.  Exercises/activities may be done individually or with group  
    discussion.
4. Exams, 3-5 per semester.

Methods of Evaluation/Basis of Grade.
Writing: Assessment tools that demonstrate writing skill and/or require students to select, organize and explain ideas in writing.Writing
10 - 30%
Written homework, research paper and/or reaction papers
Problem solving: Assessment tools, other than exams, that demonstrate competence in computational or non-computational problem solving skills.Problem Solving
10 - 30%
Homework problems, in class exercises
Skill Demonstrations: All skill-based and physical demonstrations used for assessment purposes including skill performance exams.Skill Demonstrations
0 - 0%
None
Exams: All forms of formal testing, other than skill performance exams.Exams
60 - 80%
Multiple choice, completion, true/false, matching items, problem solving, essay questions
Other: Includes any assessment tools that do not logically fit into the above categories.Other Category
0 - 10%
Attendance and participation (in class activities), individual/group projects


Representative Textbooks and Materials:
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Voyages To The Stars and Galaxies: Fraknoi, Morrison, and Wolff, Thomson-Brooks/Cole, 2006
Discovering The Universe: Freedman and Kaufmann, Freeman, 2007
Pathways To Astronomy: Schneider and Arny, McGraw Hill, 2007

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