SRJC Course Outlines

6/24/2024 6:12:31 AMENGL 4A Course Outline as of Spring 2000

Changed Course
CATALOG INFORMATION

Discipline and Nbr:  ENGL 4ATitle:  BEG CREATIVE WRIT  
Full Title:  Beginning Creative Writing
Last Reviewed:2/6/2023

UnitsCourse Hours per Week Nbr of WeeksCourse Hours Total
Maximum3.00Lecture Scheduled3.0017.5 max.Lecture Scheduled52.50
Minimum3.00Lab Scheduled06 min.Lab Scheduled0
 Contact DHR0 Contact DHR0
 Contact Total3.00 Contact Total52.50
 
 Non-contact DHR0 Non-contact DHR Total0

 Total Out of Class Hours:  105.00Total Student Learning Hours: 157.50 

Title 5 Category:  AA Degree Applicable
Grading:  Grade or P/NP
Repeatability:  00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP
Also Listed As: 
Formerly: 

Catalog Description:
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Study and writing of short fiction, poetry, or drama. Content and emphasis of particular sections specified in the English Department's course description bulletin "A Hundred Doors" issued every year.

Prerequisites/Corequisites:
Completion of ENGL 100 or ESL 100.


Recommended Preparation:

Limits on Enrollment:

Schedule of Classes Information
Description: Untitled document
Study & writing of fiction, poetry, drama, and/or non-fiction prose.
(Grade or P/NP)

Prerequisites:Completion of ENGL 100 or ESL 100.
Recommended:
Limits on Enrollment:
Transfer Credit:CSU;UC.
Repeatability:00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP

ARTICULATION, MAJOR, and CERTIFICATION INFORMATION

Associate Degree:Effective:Inactive:
 Area:
 
CSU GE:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 
IGETC:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 
CSU Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 1981Inactive:
 
UC Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 1981Inactive:
 
C-ID:
 CID Descriptor: ENGL 200 Introduction to Creative Writing SRJC Equivalent Course(s): ENGL4A

Certificate/Major Applicable: Not Certificate/Major Applicable



COURSE CONTENT

Outcomes and Objectives:
At the conclusion of this course, the student should be able to:
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READING: English 4A is a creative writing workshop and thus focuses on
the student's writing as texts to be evaluated in classroom discussions.
From reading published and student work in the genres of fiction, poetry,
drama, and/or non-fiction prose, student will learn to:
1.  Recognize and articulate the fundamental craft features of a
   literary text.
2.  Recognize and articulate the relationship between craft and meaning
   in a literary text.
3.  Identify and articulate alternative craft behaviors available to
   the writer of a piece.
WRITING: Students will write each week in the genres of fiction, poetry,
drama, and/or non-fiction prose.

Topics and Scope
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Note: the following represents general criteria and typical content.
Particular themes and emphases are published each year in the English
Department bulletin, A HUNDRED DOORS.
READING:
1.  Students read examples of published work in the genres of fiction,
   poetry, drama, and/or non-fiction prose.
2.  Readings are followed by discussion and instruction, so students
   might learn the craft and standards of the genres' professional
   writers.
3.  Students read examples of work in the genres of  fiction, poetry,
   drama, and/or non-fiction prose by their classmates.
4.  Readings are followed by discussion and instruction, so students
   might learn the craft of the genres.
WRITINGS: 1.  Students write weekly in the genres of fiction, poetry,
   drama, and/or non-fiction prose.
2.  Revision skills are taught, using writers' workshop methods or
    individual conferences/tutorials.

Assignments:
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Note: The following represent tupes of assignments in English 4A.
WRITING:
1.  Students are asked to write a poem in an established form, for
   instance an Italian or Petrarchan sonnet.
2.  Students are asked to write a poem with a controlling metaphor.
3.  Students are asked to develop a character through description
   (third person narrator without omniscience).
4.  Students are asked to develop conflict between two characters
   through dialogue.

Methods of Evaluation/Basis of Grade.
Writing: Assessment tools that demonstrate writing skill and/or require students to select, organize and explain ideas in writing.Writing
80 - 90%
Written homework
Problem solving: Assessment tools, other than exams, that demonstrate competence in computational or non-computational problem solving skills.Problem Solving
0 - 0%
None
Skill Demonstrations: All skill-based and physical demonstrations used for assessment purposes including skill performance exams.Skill Demonstrations
0 - 10%
Class performances
Exams: All forms of formal testing, other than skill performance exams.Exams
0 - 0%
None
Other: Includes any assessment tools that do not logically fit into the above categories.Other Category
0 - 0%
None


Representative Textbooks and Materials:
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Behn, Robin and Chase Twichell, eds. THE PRACTICE OF POETRY. New York:
    Harper, 1992.
Bernays, Anne and Pamela Painter. WHAT IF?: WRITING EXERCISES FOR FICTION
    WRITERS. New York: Harper, 1995.
Burke, Carol and Molly Best Tinsley. THE CREATIVE PROCESS. New York:
    St. Martin's, 1993.
DeMaria, Robert. THE COLLEGE HANDBOOK OF CREATIVE WRITING. 3rd ed.
    Fort Worth: Harcourt, 1998.
Gardner, John. THE ART OF FICTION. New York: Vintage, 1991.
LeGuin, Ursula K. STEERING THE CRAFT. Portland, OR: Eighth Mountain
    Press, 1998.
Lopate, Phillip, ed. THE ART OF THE PERSONAL ESSAY. New York: Anchor/
    Doubleday, 1995.
Minot, Stephen. THREE GENRES: THE WRITING OF POETRY, FICTION, AND
    DRAMA. 6th ed. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice, 1998.
Ueland, Brenda. IF YOU WANT TO WRITE. 2nd ed. Saint Paul: Greywolf,
    1987.

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