SRJC Course Outlines

10/31/2020 12:56:55 PMSPAN 4 Course Outline as of Fall 1998

Changed Course
CATALOG INFORMATION

Discipline and Nbr:  SPAN 4Title:  INTERMED SPAN-2  
Full Title:  Intermediate Spanish - Part 2
Last Reviewed:11/25/2019

UnitsCourse Hours per Week Nbr of WeeksCourse Hours Total
Maximum4.00Lecture Scheduled4.0017.5 max.Lecture Scheduled70.00
Minimum4.00Lab Scheduled06 min.Lab Scheduled0
 Contact DHR0 Contact DHR0
 Contact Total4.00 Contact Total70.00
 
 Non-contact DHR0 Non-contact DHR Total0

 Total Out of Class Hours:  140.00Total Student Learning Hours: 210.00 

Title 5 Category:  AA Degree Applicable
Grading:  Grade or P/NP
Repeatability:  00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP
Also Listed As: 
Formerly: 

Catalog Description:
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Spanish language skills improved through research compositions, analytical essays, readings, and critical discussions focusing on American cultures. Utilizing modern and classical Spanish language literature, students will explore at least three of the following groups in those areas of the United States most affected by Spanish and its literature: African American, Asian American, Chicano/Latino American, European American, Indigenous Peoples of the Americas, and Americans of Middle Eastern origin.

Prerequisites/Corequisites:
Completion of 4 years of high school Spanish or Span 3.


Recommended Preparation:
Completion of ENGL 100 or ESL 100 (including parallel course in a native language other than English).

Limits on Enrollment:

Schedule of Classes Information
Description: Untitled document
Research compositions, analytical essays, reading & critical discussions in modern and classical Spanish focusing on American cultures. Students will explore issues of race, ethnicity, and gender in those areas in the United States where Spanish is commonly used.
(Grade or P/NP)

Prerequisites:Completion of 4 years of high school Spanish or Span 3.
Recommended:Completion of ENGL 100 or ESL 100 (including parallel course in a native language other than English).
Limits on Enrollment:
Transfer Credit:CSU;UC.
Repeatability:00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP

ARTICULATION, MAJOR, and CERTIFICATION INFORMATION

Associate Degree:Effective:Spring 1982
Inactive: 
 Area:E
G
Humanities
American Cultures/Ethnic Studies
 
CSU GE:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 C2HumanitiesSpring 1982
 
IGETC:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 3BHumanitiesFall 1981
 6ALanguage Other Than English  
 
CSU Transfer:TransferableEffective:Spring 1982Inactive:
 
UC Transfer:TransferableEffective:Spring 1982Inactive:
 
C-ID:
 CID Descriptor: SPAN 210 Intermediate Spanish II SRJC Equivalent Course(s): SPAN4

Certificate/Major Applicable: Not Certificate/Major Applicable



COURSE CONTENT

Outcomes and Objectives:
Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:
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  LISTENING: Demonstrate in Spanish an ability to understand virtually all
face to face discussions delivered with normal clarity and speed involving
the values, customs, and mores of diverse groups within the American
cultural experience. Demonstrate familiarity with many idiomatic
expressions and phrasal verbs; respond appropriately, verbally and non-
verbally, to various levels of politeness, formality, and register,
especially academic; identify and comprehend main ideas and most
supporting details in lectures and discussions; recognize verbal and non-
verbal signals of organization and importance in lectures; and understand
new vocabulary in context using guessing strategies.  Ability to recognize
and define critical but open-minded discourse relevant to understanding
the meaning of dynamic interactions between race, ethnicity, and gender in
those areas of the United States most affected by Spanish and its
literature. Demonstrate sensitivity to issues affecting diverse racial and
ethnic groups through the formulation of cogent questions and comments.
 SPEAKING: Demonstrate in Spanish an ability to express cogently and
critically an opinion to a variety of topics on American Cultures.  Use
Spanish for a variety of purposes:  questioning, paraphrasing, defining,
describing, narrating, arguing, commenting, criticizing, and persuading;
self monitor and peer evaluate for effective and open-minded discourse in
formal as well as informal interactions; use nonverbal communication
appropriately:  posture, gestures, facial expression, and eye contact;
speak in an integrative and comparative manner; maintain a conversation
and use many idiomatic expressions; demonstrate awareness of levels of
politeness, formality and register, including inappropriate language such
as racist or sexist terms; use discussion and conversational strategies
effectively; and use intonation, pitch, and pauses to enhance or emphasize
the message; to discuss clearly on major theoretical and analytical issues
relevant to understanding the meaning of and dynamic interactions between
race, ethnicity, and gender in those areas of the United States most
affected by Spanish and its literature. Students are encouraged to look at
their classroom settings and surrounding society as a language laboratory
where every student can use their Spanish language skills as a primary
tool in understanding how cultural responsiveness makes for a mutual
respect for all cultures and perspectives.
 READING: Spanish language learning will be defined to include not only
classical literature but also borderland (i.e., Chicano) literature.
Students will skim for main idea; scan for information; differentiate
between main idea and supporting points; take notes, summarize, and
paraphrase for various purposes; read between the lines for inference,
assumption, and presupposition; read critically; identify author's point
of view, tone, and purpose; recognize bias when it exists; demonstrate
significant library research skills; analyze rhetorical patterns,
discourse cues, and structural pointers to follow the development of the
author's ideas; increase reading speed; vary speed and methods according
to type of material and purpose for reading; use Spanish college level
dictionary effectively; guess word meanings by analyzing prefixes,
suffixes, and roots; infer meaning of unknown vocabulary by using
contextual clues; evaluate the relevance of textual material to particular
research goals and identify sources that support particular arguments; and
understand the organization of books, journals, newspapers, and essays
relevant to understanding the meaning of and dynamic interactions between
race, ethnicity, and gender in those areas of the United States most
affected by Spanish and its literature.
 COMPOSITION: Through theme and tasked based instruction students will
develop an awareness of the interactions of a variety of cultural
traditions that have shaped the American experience. Students will
demonstrate an ability to write cogently and critically in
Spanish on a variety of cultural topics on American Culture that includes
three or more of the following groups: European American, African
American, Asian American, Chicano/Latino American, Indigenous Peoples of
the Americas, and Americans of Middle Eastern origin.  Cogent and critical
writing skills require the development of skills as follows: formulating a
research question, revising for organization, style, and content; and
mastering the five paragraph essay to include thesis statement, adequate
paragraph development and conclusion.  Additionally, a student should be
able to develop and logically support a main idea in an expository essay;
consider audience and intention; support a focus statement with original
ideas and information from text, synthesize; employ essay examination
skills by: synthesizing relevant information from reading and lectures,
and writing under time pressure; write a short research paper summarizing
journal articles and other sources, avoiding plagiarism, documenting
sources with annotated bibliography, and using a variety of clause
patterns and subordination; and exhibit a sense of literary style.
 OVERALL OBJECTIVE: After participation in Spanish Four students should
be able to integrate critical thinking in all of the four Spanish language
skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. Specific outcomes may
include but are not limited to the student's ability to: (1) identify and
describe in Spanish various factors that influence cultural diversity, (2)
understand and explain through examples how human behavior can hinder or
mitigate cultural responsiveness, (3) discuss how a variety of cultural
traditions and their interactions have shaped American experience, (4)
analyze the impact that certain cultural diversity issues have on their
community, (5) compare and contrast the various forces that affect
cultural diversity, (6) develop an appreciation for and describe the
contributions that a culturally diverse population has made to society,
and (7) form a critical opinion about specific themes or forces that
affect cultural diversity.

Topics and Scope
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CONTENT:
AMERICAN CULTURES FOCUS
This course will consist of further developing student's listening,
speaking, reading, and writing skills in Spanish. Students will engage in
critical discussion based on information gathered by giving and listening
to prepared lectures, and by reading selected materials found in modern
and classical Spanish language literature that relates to American
Cultures.  All materials heard, discussed or read will serve as data to
write at least three compositions, one analytical essay, and one semester
project on a variety of viewpoints on American Cultures.  The class will
result in a balanced treatment of three or more of the following groups:
European American, African American, Asian American, Chicano/Latino
American, Indigenous Peoples of the Americas, and Americans of Middle
Eastern origin.  Issues relevant to understanding race, ethnicity and
gender through the study of designated groups will be structured in an
integrative and comparative manner focusing on these areas of the United
States most by Spanish and its literature: California, New Mexico,
Arizona, Texas, Colorado, New York and Florida.
 Listening: Standard sources used for Spanish listening practice and
development are as follows: traditional academic lectures by a single
speaker with ample opportunity for questions and discussion, panel
presentations and discussion, listening to recordings and announcements,
communicating by telephone, listening to radio and television broadcasts,
watching movies and plays, and face-to-face conversations.
 Reading & Writing: Standard sources used for Spanish reading and writing
practice and development are as follows: writing analytical compositions
and other papers based on research gathered from reading materials from
adapted and unadapted text such as academic materials, newspaper articles,
editorials, commentaries, technical reports, novels, short stories, drama,
and poetry.
 Grammar: Grammar content is more individual and specific in nature
rather than group structured.  It is analyzed and discussed in the context
of the assigned readings and written work produced by students.
SCOPE:
Scope of what is covered in Spanish 4 goes beyond what is normally taught
in the most advanced high school Spanish language course (Four years of
instruction is the maximum taught in most high schools). This course also
corresponds to an Intermediate, Part II Spanish college level text.

Assignments:
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Spanish 4 instructors will use a variety of resources to encourage
students to develop Spanish language skills and to appropriately use them
to discuss and research issues and topics of interest in the area of
American cultures.  Available resources can include readings, writings,
lectures, student presentations, video tapes and other media.  The
majority of the assignments are intended to give students an American
cultures focus that follow American Cultures guidelines.  Among the
assignments under consideration are as follows:
1.  Actively participate in all class meetings and demonstrate that
readings or other materials assigned by instructor were appropriately
reviewed and studied.  Participation also means working cooperatively and
effectively with a partner or a group during time periods set aside by the
instructor to discuss specific issues or questions.
2.  Prepare and participate in at least one focussed oral presentation or
panel discussion on a topic negotiated with the instructor.  Students who
are in the audience and aren't directly involved in the presentation are
expected to listen critically and formulate questions about the
presentation.  The expectation is that questions are indicative of a
thoughtful, serious, curious and critical mind at work.  Subject to time
constraints, these questions can be used for a question & answer period
and/or collected by the instructor.
3.  Write at least three compositions on topics negotiated with the
instructor.  The instructor will provide students with a standard
guideline for writing compositions and will evaluate written work
according to those standards.
4.  Write three analytical essays on topics negotiated with the
instructor.  At lease one of the essays must be argumentative/persuasive
in style, structure, and purpose.  All other essays are intended to get
students to contrast, compare, describe or analyze some significant aspect
of one or more of the American cultures.
5.  Write one semester paper on a topic negotiated with the instructor.
The instructor will provide students with standard investigative
guidelines for writing a semester paper that includes an annotated
bibliography.  The papers will be evaluated according to those standards.
6.  Take a written or an oral final examination, or a final examination
consisting of both oral and written parts. The purpose of the final
examination is to determine to what degree a student can use Spanish
language skills to cogently express a point of view on some aspect of
American cultures.

Methods of Evaluation/Basis of Grade.
Writing: Assessment tools that demonstrate writing skill and/or require students to select, organize and explain ideas in writing.Writing
20 - 60%
Written homework, Reading reports, Essay exams, Term papers
Problem solving: Assessment tools, other than exams, that demonstrate competence in computational or non-computational problem solving skills.Problem Solving
15 - 30%
correspond to American Cultures Requirement
Skill Demonstrations: All skill-based and physical demonstrations used for assessment purposes including skill performance exams.Skill Demonstrations
15 - 30%
Class performances, Performance exams
Exams: All forms of formal testing, other than skill performance exams.Exams
5 - 10%
Multiple choice, True/false, Matching items, Completion
Other: Includes any assessment tools that do not logically fit into the above categories.Other Category
5 - 10%
COMPLETION OF REQUIRED HOURS OF LANGUAGE LAB


Representative Textbooks and Materials:
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Excerpts from:
  Aguirre Beltran, Gonzalo. OBRA ANTROPOLOGICA VII: ESBOZO ETNOGRAFICO DE
UN PUEBLO NEGRO, Jalapa, Mexico: Universidad Veracruzana Instituto
Nacional Indigenista, 1989.
  Alaman Lucas D., comp. HERNAN CORTES Y LA CONQUISTA DE MEXICO (TOMO
II). Mexico D.F.: Editorial Jus, 1985.
  Baroja, Julio Caro. LOS JUDIOS EN LA ESPANA MODERNA Y CONTEMPORANEA
(TOMO I-III). Madrid: Ediciones Ismo, 1978.
  Beltran, A., comp. VISION DE LOS VENCIDOS: RELACIONES INDIGENAS DE LA
CONQUISTA. Mexico D.F.: Universidad Nacional Autonoma De Mexico, 1992.
  Bravo Ugarte, Jose. HISTORIS SUCINTA DE MICHOACAN. Mexico D.F.:
Editorial Jus, 1963.
  Castillo Pedro G. & Antonio Rios Bustamante (Traduccion por Ana Rosa
Gonzalez Matute). MEXICO EN LOS ANGELES: UNA HISTORIA SOCIAL 6 CULTURAL,
1781-1985. Mexico, D.F.: Alianza Editorial Mexicana, 1989 (Primera edicion
en idioma espanol).
  Cruz Olivia, Oscar Rene, comp. AVENTURAS Y DESVENTURAS DEL PADRE KINO
EN LA PIMERIA ALTA. Mexico, D.F.: Asociacion Nacional de Libreros, 1986.
  Del Barco, Miguel. HISTORIA NATURAL Y CRONICA DE LA ANTIGUA
CALIFORNIA., Mexico D.F.: Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico 1988.
  Esparza Sanchez, Cuauhtemoc, comp. ZACATECAS ANUARIO DE HISTORIA.
Zacatecas, Mexico: Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, 1979.
  Galaviz de Capdevielle, Maria Elena. REVELIONES INDIGENAS EN EL NORTE
DEL REINO DEL LA NUEVA ESPANA: SIGLO XVI-XVII. Mexico, D.F.: Editorial
Campesina, 1967.
  Gallegos, Jose Ignacio. HISTORIA DE LA IGLESIA EN DURANGO. Mexico D.F.:
Editorial Jus, 1969.
  Gerhard, Peter. SINTESIS E INDICE DE LOS MANDAMIENTOS VIRREINALES:
1448-1553. Mexico D.F.: Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, 1992.
  -----------LA FRONTERA NORTE DE LA NUEVA ESPANA. Mexico D.F.:
Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, 1996.
  Grimes, Ronald L., SIMBOLO Y CONQUISTA: RITUALES Y TEATRO EN SANTA FE,
NUEVO MEXICO. Micico D.F.: Fondo de Cultura Economica, 1981.
  Guerro Vazquez, Jose. comp. CATALOGO DE DOCUMENTOS DEL SIGLO XVI DEL
ARCHIVO GENERAL DEL ESTADO DE TLAXCALA (VOLUMEN 8). Mexico, D.F.: Archivo
General de la Nacion, 1988.
  Herrera Carrillo, Pablo, comp. FRAY JUNIPERO SERRA: CIVILIZADOR DE LAS
CALIFORNIAS. Mexico D.F.: Ediciones Xochitl, 1943.
  Icazbalceta Garia, Joaquin, comp.      DON TRAY JUAN DE ZUMARRAGA:
PRIMER OBISPO Y ARZABISPO DE MEXICO (TOMO I-III). Mexico, D.F.: Editorial
Porrua, 1988.
  Icaza, Francisco A. DICCIONARIO AUTOBIOGRAFICO DE CONQUISTADORES Y
POBLADORES DE NUEVA ESPANA (TOMO I & II). Madrid, 1923.
  Motolinia, Fray, Toribio. HISTORIA DE LOS INDIOS DE LAS NUEVA ESPANA.
Mexico D.F.: Editorial Salvador Chavez Hayhoe, 1941.
  Munoz Camargo, Diego. HISTORIA DE TLAXCALA. Mexico D.F.: Edicion
Chavero, 1892.
  Periz-Rocha, Emma. APORTACIONES A LA INVESTIGACION DE ARCHIVOS DEL
MEXICO COLONIAL Y A LA BIBLIOHEMEROGRAFIA AFROMEXICANISTA. Mexico D.F.:
Instituto Nacional de Antropologia e Historia, 1992.
  Porras Munos, Guillermo. EL GOBIERNO DE LA DIUDAD DE MEXICO EN EL SIGLO
XVI. Mexico D.F.: Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, 1982.
  Powell, Philip W. LA GUERRA CHICHIMECA (1550-1600). Mexico D.F.: Fondo
de Cultura Economica, 1992.
  Rubio Mane, Jose Ignacio, comp. DON LUIS DE VELASCO, EL VIRREY POPULAR.
Mexico D.F.: Ediciones Xochitl, 1946.
  Saravia, Atansio G. APUNTES PARA LA HISTORIA DE LA NUEVA VIZCAYA (OBRAS
I-IV). Mexico D.F.: Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, 1978.
-----------LOS MISIONEROS MUERTO EN EL NOTRE DE NUEVA ESPANA. Mexico D.F.:
Ediciones Botas, 1943.
  Swadesh, Frances Leon, LOS PRIMEROS POBLADORES: ANTECESORES DE LOS
CHICANO EN NUEVA MEXICO. Mexico D.F.: Fondo de Cultura Economica, 1977.
Yanez, Agustin, comp. FRAY BARTOLOME DE LAS CASAS: DOCTRINA. Mexico D.F.:
Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico. 1982.
  Zavala, Silvio, LOS ESCLAVOS INDIOS EN NUEVA ESPANA. Mexico, D.F.: El
Colegio Nacional, 1994.
-----------ORDENANZAS DEL TRABAJO, SIGLO VVI Y XVII. Mixico, D.F.:
Editorial Elede, 1947.

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