SRJC Course Outlines

3/31/2023 12:10:20 AMCIS 110A Course Outline as of Spring 2004

New Course (First Version)
CATALOG INFORMATION

Discipline and Nbr:  CIS 110ATitle:  PROGRAMMING CONCEPTS  
Full Title:  Concepts for Beginning Programmers
Last Reviewed:9/10/2018

UnitsCourse Hours per Week Nbr of WeeksCourse Hours Total
Maximum1.50Lecture Scheduled3.008 max.Lecture Scheduled24.00
Minimum1.50Lab Scheduled08 min.Lab Scheduled0
 Contact DHR0 Contact DHR0
 Contact Total3.00 Contact Total24.00
 
 Non-contact DHR0 Non-contact DHR Total0

 Total Out of Class Hours:  48.00Total Student Learning Hours: 72.00 

Title 5 Category:  AA Degree Applicable
Grading:  Grade Only
Repeatability:  00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP
Also Listed As: 
Formerly: 

Catalog Description:
Untitled document
A brief introduction to computer programming concepts using languages appropriate to such learning. This course is designed for students who do not intend to pursue further study of computer programming or who intend to continue in the field but desire a gentle introduction to the subject. Taught in a hands-on environment.

Prerequisites/Corequisites:


Recommended Preparation:

Limits on Enrollment:

Schedule of Classes Information
Description: Untitled document
A brief introduction to computer programming concepts using languages appropriate to such learning. This course is designed for students who do not intend to pursue further study of computer programming or who intend to continue in the field but desire a gentle introduction to the subject. Taught in a hands-on environment.
(Grade Only)

Prerequisites:
Recommended:
Limits on Enrollment:
Transfer Credit:
Repeatability:00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP

ARTICULATION, MAJOR, and CERTIFICATION INFORMATION

Associate Degree:Effective:Inactive:
 Area:
 
CSU GE:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 
IGETC:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 
CSU Transfer:Effective:Inactive:
 
UC Transfer:Effective:Inactive:
 
C-ID:

Certificate/Major Applicable: Certificate Applicable Course



COURSE CONTENT

Outcomes and Objectives:
At the conclusion of this course, the student should be able to:
Untitled document
Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:
1.  Create correct algorithms
2.  Design and implement computer programs that employ conditional and
   repetitive control structures.
3.  Design and implement computer programs that employ subprograms.
4.  Classify program errors.
5.  Design and implement computer programs using stepwise refinement.
6.  Design and implement computer programs that employ simple recursion.

Topics and Scope
Untitled document
I.   Primitive instructions
II.  Basic program structure
III. Classifying programming errors
IV.  Creating and calling subprograms
    A.  The Correctness of subprograms
    B.  Stepwise refinement
    C.  Program design techniques
    D.  Advantages of using subprograms
    E.  Writing understandable programs
V.   Conditional Execution
    A.  If statements
    B.  If/else statements
    C.  Nested if statements
    D.  Complex conditions
    E.  When to use conditional execution
    F.  Transformations for simplifying if statements
    G.  The dangling else
VI.  Repetitive Execution
    A.  While statements
    B.  Errors to avoid with repetitive execution
    C.  Nested while statements
    D.  Reasoning about while statements
    E.  When to use repetitive execution
VII. Simple recursion

Assignments:
Untitled document
1.  Maintain a reading schedule for the text(s), approximately 20 pages
   per week.
2.  Write computer programs.
3.  Test and debug computer programs.
4.  Take objective examinations.

Methods of Evaluation/Basis of Grade.
Writing: Assessment tools that demonstrate writing skill and/or require students to select, organize and explain ideas in writing.Writing
0 - 0%
None
This is a degree applicable course but assessment tools based on writing are not included because problem solving assessments are more appropriate for this course.
Problem solving: Assessment tools, other than exams, that demonstrate competence in computational or non-computational problem solving skills.Problem Solving
30 - 70%
Writing computer programs
Skill Demonstrations: All skill-based and physical demonstrations used for assessment purposes including skill performance exams.Skill Demonstrations
0 - 0%
None
Exams: All forms of formal testing, other than skill performance exams.Exams
30 - 70%
Multiple choice, True/false, Matching items, Completion, Computer programming questions
Other: Includes any assessment tools that do not logically fit into the above categories.Other Category
0 - 0%
None


Representative Textbooks and Materials:
Untitled document
"A Gentle Introduction to the Art of Programming, Second Edition",
by Richard E. Pattis - John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 1995

Print PDF