SRJC Course Outlines

5/5/2021 11:05:29 PMAJ 22 Course Outline as of Fall 2000

Changed Course
CATALOG INFORMATION

Discipline and Nbr:  AJ 22Title:  CRIM LAW CONCPT  
Full Title:  Concepts of Criminal Law
Last Reviewed:9/25/2017

UnitsCourse Hours per Week Nbr of WeeksCourse Hours Total
Maximum3.00Lecture Scheduled3.0017.5 max.Lecture Scheduled52.50
Minimum3.00Lab Scheduled017.5 min.Lab Scheduled0
 Contact DHR0 Contact DHR0
 Contact Total3.00 Contact Total52.50
 
 Non-contact DHR0 Non-contact DHR Total0

 Total Out of Class Hours:  105.00Total Student Learning Hours: 157.50 

Title 5 Category:  AA Degree Applicable
Grading:  Grade Only
Repeatability:  00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP
Also Listed As: 
Formerly: 

Catalog Description:
Untitled document
Historical development, philosophy of law and constitutional provisions; definitions, classification of crime and their application to the system of Administration of Justice; legal research, study of case law, methodology and concepts of law as a social force.  Law as it affects the correctional component of the justice system will be clearly identified.

Prerequisites/Corequisites:


Recommended Preparation:
Eligibility for ENGL 100A or ENGL 100.

Limits on Enrollment:

Schedule of Classes Information
Description: Untitled document
Historical development, philosophy of law & constitutional provisions; definitions, classifications of crime & their application to the system of Administration of Justice; legal research, study of case law, methodology & concepts of law as a social force.
(Grade Only)

Prerequisites:
Recommended:Eligibility for ENGL 100A or ENGL 100.
Limits on Enrollment:
Transfer Credit:CSU;UC.
Repeatability:00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP

ARTICULATION, MAJOR, and CERTIFICATION INFORMATION

Associate Degree:Effective:Inactive:
 Area:
 
CSU GE:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 
IGETC:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 
CSU Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 1981Inactive:
 
UC Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 1981Inactive:
 
C-ID:
 CID Descriptor: AJ 120 Concepts of Criminal Law SRJC Equivalent Course(s): AJ22

Certificate/Major Applicable: Certificate Applicable Course



COURSE CONTENT

Outcomes and Objectives:
Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:
Untitled document
COURSE OUTCOMES:
This course supplements the degree program with an historical overview
of the development of law.  There is a review of constitutional
provisions of law as they integrate with fundamentals of State law.
The course covers the conceptual aspects of substantive law so that
students will develop an appreciation of legal concepts as they relate
to the justice process.
COURSE OBJECTIVES:
    1.  The student will respond to the stated evaluation criteria with
        acceptable accuracy to questions regarding the historical
perspective, cultural evolution, and the origin of criminal law
in the Common Law.
    2.  When introduced to the basic legal definitions and concepts of
        law for nonlawyers, the student will demonstrate the ability
        to cope with operational experiences by applying these definition
        and concepts to the relevant legal codes in the administration
   of justice.  The student will be able to outline the
classifications of criminal laws and their punitive applications.
3.  When confronted with specific legal problems, the student will
   be able to locate the appropriate related statutes or cases and
   exercise sound judgment based upon a deductive analysis. Judgment
   and ability to communicate this position will be demonstrated
        through development of assigned written case studies.
4.  The student will examine the Constitutional basis of criminal
law, and when confronted with constitutional legal issues, the
student will demonstrate awareness through presentation of
assigned written case studies.
5.  The student will identify concepts of Introduction to Criminal
Law, LD5 (min. 6 hrs.) of the Basic Law Enforcement Course
curriculum adopted by the California Commission on Peace Officer
Standards and Training (P.O.S.T.).  Performance Objective numbers
are identified herein: 3.1.1, 3.1.5, 3.1.6, 3.3.1, 3.4.3, and
3.5.1. (Refer to complete outline for specific content).
3.8.3, 3.37.1, 3.38.1, 3.38.2, 3.38.4, 3.38.7, 3.38.9, 3.38.12-
3.38.13 (Refer to complete outline for specific content).
6.      The student will outline the statutory provisions specific to
correctional institutions.

Topics and Scope
Untitled document
WEEK
1.  COURSE ORIENTATION
    A. Attendance and class participation
    B. Testing and grading policies
    C. Outside class assignments
    D. AJ/Basic Course "Transition Program - Pilot Project"
2.  LEGAL RESEARCH AND METHODOLOGY
    A. Case citations and case reporters
    B. Legal encyclopedias
    C. Annotated Codes
    D. How to write a case brief
    E. Use of the law library
    F. Attorney General opinions
3.  LEGAL, PHILOSOPHICAL AND HISTORICAL DEVELOPMENT OF THE LAW
    A.  Statute Law (3.1.6)
        1. Legislative
        2. Initiative
    B.  Constitutional (3.1.6)
    C.  Case law and Stare Decisis (3.1.6)
        1. Doctrine of Judicial Review
    D.  Common law (3.1.6)
    E.  Historical periods in England
    F.  Historical periods in U.S.
    G.  Diversity among societies in the world
4 & 5 SOURCES OF STATUTE LAW
    A.  United States Code (principal references)
    B.  California statutory law (principal references)
        1. Business and Professions Code
        2. Education Code
        3. Fish and Game Code
        4. Health and Safety Code
        5. Penal Code
        6. Evidence Code
        7. Welfare and Institutions Code
        8. Vehicle Code
    C.  Municipal Codes and County ordinances (3.1.6)
    D.  Repeal/Amendment
    E.  Mala in se vs. mala prohibita crimes
    F.  Crimes without victims
    G.  Pre-emption and Police power of the state
6 & 7.  CONSTITUTIONAL LAW
    A.  U.S. Constitution provisions
        1. Identify key constitutional rights protected by the 1st, 4th,
           5th, 6th, 8th and 14th (Due Process and Equal Protection)
           Amendments.
    B.  California constitution provisions
        1. Independent state grounds
8.  NATURE OF CRIMINAL LAW
    A.  Definition of a crime (3.1.6)
    B.  Purpose of criminal law
    C.  The language and construction of penal statutes
    D.  Conflicts between statutes
E. Difference between a crime and tort (3.1.5 & 3.1.6)
F. Crimes against property
G. Crimes against the person
H. Crimes against the public order
9.  CLASSIFICATION OF CRIMES
    A.  Felonies, misdemeanors, "wobblers", and infractions (3.1.6)
    B.  Punishments
        1. Determinate sentencing
        2. Indeterminate sentencing
        3. Enhancements
        4. "Three Strikes"
        5. Special Circumstances
    C.  Lesser and included offenses
    D.  Double jeopardy & dual sovereignty doctrine
    E.  Statute of limitations
    F.  Jurisdiction and venue
    G.  District Attorney charging considerations
10. CORPUS DELICTI - ELEMENTS OF A CRIME
    A.  Role of corpus delicti (3.1.6)
    B.  Criminal transaction (20 P.C.) (3.1.6)
    C.  General, specific (transferred intent (3.1.6)
    D.  Criminal negligence (3.1.6)
11. CAPACITY TO COMMIT AN OFFENSE
    A.  Exemptions to criminal liability (26 P.C.)(3.1.6)
        1. Children under 14 years
        2. Idiots
        3. Ignorance or mistake of fact
        4. Unconscious of the act
        5. Accident or misfortune
        6. Acting under threats or menaces
    B.  Intoxication
        1. Voluntary (22 P.C.)
        2. Involuntary (26 P.C.)
    C.  Mitigating factors and other defenses
12. PARTIES TO A CRIME (3.1.6 & 3.4.3)
    A.  Principal
    B.  Accomplice and feigned accomplice
    C.  Accessory
13 & 14.  LAWS OF ARREST
    A.  Arrest defined (834 P.C.)
    B.  Custody defined (835 P.C.)
    C.  Use of force in making an arrest (834a P.C.)
    D.  Peace officer authority to arrest (836 P.C.)
    E.  Service of arrest warrants (840 P.C.)
    F.  Residential entry (Ramey and Steagald rules)
H. Private person arrests (837, 847, 142 P.C.)
15. Criminal law as it affects the correctional component of the justice
system.
A. Crimes against/within Penal institutions
       1. Control of contraband
       2. Assaults against staff
       3. Assaults against prisoners
       4. Escapes/attempts
B. Crimes by staff
       1. Assaults on inmates
       2. Introduction of contraband
       3. Undue familiarity/overfamiliarity
       4. Official Acts

Assignments:
Untitled document
     1.  Clarify terms and develop analytical skills by studying a text
        which is certified as college level.
    2.  Develop skills in writing as a result of case history analysis
        and statute interpretation.
    3.  Assign oral presentation in class requiring deductive analysis
        from text, law and case analysis.
    4.  Demonstrate skills mastered by the completion of essay and
        objective examinations requiring timed responses.

Methods of Evaluation/Basis of Grade.
Writing: Assessment tools that demonstrate writing skill and/or require students to select, organize and explain ideas in writing.Writing
10 - 20%
Written homework
Problem solving: Assessment tools, other than exams, that demonstrate competence in computational or non-computational problem solving skills.Problem Solving
10 - 30%
Homework problems, Quizzes, Exams
Skill Demonstrations: All skill-based and physical demonstrations used for assessment purposes including skill performance exams.Skill Demonstrations
5 - 10%
Class performances, Performance exams
Exams: All forms of formal testing, other than skill performance exams.Exams
25 - 60%
Multiple choice, True/false, Completion
Other: Includes any assessment tools that do not logically fit into the above categories.Other Category
0 - 0%
None


Representative Textbooks and Materials:
Untitled document
1. Chamlin, Robert and Richard Evans, CRIMINAL LAW FOR PEACE OFFICERS, 5th
ed., Prentice Hall.
2. Del Carmen, Rolando V., Susan E. Ritter and Betsy A. Witt, BRIEFS OF
LEADING CASES IN CORRECTIONS, (Current Edition).
3. Hunt, Donald D., CALIFORNIA CRIMINAL LAW CONCEPTS (Current Edition),
Burgess International Group, Edina, Minnesota.
4. Payton, George T., PEACE OFFICERS GUIDE TO CRIMINAL LAW (Current
Edition),Criminal Justice Services, San Jose, 1995.
5. CALIFORNIA COMMISSION ON PEACE OFFICER STANDARDS AND TRAINING, Basic
Law Enforcement Course workbooks, L.D.#2, 5 and 15 (Current Edition).

Print PDF